Links: 2014 News Graphics Round-Ups

January 14, 2015
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In the past, it used to be difficult to find news graphics from the main news organizations. In the last few years, they have started to post year-end lists of their work, which are always a treat to walk through. With the new year a few weeks behind us, this is a good time to … Continue reading Links: 2014 News Graphics Round-Ups

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Some art so far

January 14, 2015
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Some art so far

In response to my request #1 (“Gone Fishing” T-shirt), Ed Witt sent in this: I thanked Ed and asked if it would be possible to take the image and add to it so it’s clear that the “.05” is being drawn from a sea of other numbers, also with a little bucket next to the […] The post Some art so far appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Using the microbenchmark package to compare the execution time of R expressions

January 14, 2015
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Using the microbenchmark package to compare the execution time of R expressions

I recently learned about the microbenchmark package while browsing through Hadley’s advanced R programming book. I’ve done some quick benchmarking using system.time() in a for loop and taking the average, but the microbenchmark function in the micr...

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Calling a global statement inside a loop

January 14, 2015
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Calling a global statement inside a loop

The other day I was creating some histograms inside a loop in PROC IML. It was difficult for me to determine which histogram was associated with which value of the looping variable. "No problem," I said. "I'll just use a TITLE statement inside the loop so that each histogram has […]

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simulation by inverse cdf

January 13, 2015
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simulation by inverse cdf

Another Cross Validated forum question that led me to an interesting (?) reconsideration of certitudes! When simulating from a normal distribution, is Box-Muller algorithm better or worse than using the inverse cdf transform? My first reaction was to state that Box-Muller was exact while the inverse cdf relied on the coding of the inverse cdf, like […]

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Why you need a second pair of eyes

January 13, 2015
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Why you need a second pair of eyes

Reader Aaron K. submitted an infographic advertising the upcoming New England Auto Show to be held in Boston (link). As Aaron pointed out, there is plenty of elementary errors contained in one page. I don't think the designer did these...

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Artist needed!

January 13, 2015
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We have some great ideas but none of us can draw. We need your help with designs and art for any or all of these projects: 1. “Gone Fishing” T-shirt A person is standing in a boat, fishing. The lake is full, not of fish but of little numbers: “.14″, “.31″, “.08″, etc etc. And […] The post Artist needed! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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r4stats.com 2014 in review

January 13, 2015
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r4stats.com 2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 260,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at … Continue reading →

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Extended Kalman filter example in R

January 13, 2015
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Extended Kalman filter example in R

Last week's post about the Kalman filter focused on the derivation of the algorithm. Today I will continue with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) that can deal also with nonlinearities. According to Wikipedia the EKF has been considered the de facto sta...

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No-go zones?

January 12, 2015
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No-go zones?

I think this is really serious: that's the story of an "expert" on terrorism, who's commented on Fox News about the situation in Europe. If you really want to laugh about it, you just take this at face value, as, erm, let's just say, "somebody" who jus...

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Trifacta revisited: tackling a Big Data problem

January 12, 2015
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During my vacation, I had a chance to visit Trifacta, the data-wrangling startup I blogged about last year (link). Wei Zheng, Tye Rattenbury, and Will Davis hosted me, and showed some of the new stuff they are working on. Trifacta is tackling a major Big Data problem, and I remain excited about the direction they are heading. From the beginning, I am attracted by Trifacta’s user interface. The user in…

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What’s misleading about the phrase, “Statistical significance is not the same as practical significance”

January 12, 2015
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You’ve heard it a million times, the idea is that if you have an estimate of .003 (on some reasonable scale in which 1 is a meaningful effect size) and a standard error of .001 then, yes, the estimate is statistically significant but it’s not practically significant. And, indeed, sometimes this sort of thing comes […] The post What’s misleading about the phrase, “Statistical significance is not the same as…

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Statistics and R for the Life Sciences: New HarvardX course starts January 19

January 12, 2015
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Statistics and R for the Life Sciences: New HarvardX course starts January 19

The first course of our Biomedical Data Science online curriculum starts next week. You can sign up here. Instead of relying on mathematical formulas to teach statistical concepts, students can program along as we show computer code for simulations that illustrate the main ideas of exploratory data analysis and statistical inference (p-values, confidence intervals and

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On deck this week

January 12, 2015
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Mon: What’s misleading about the phrase, “Statistical significance is not the same as practical significance” Tues: Artist needed! Wed: Stan comes through . . . again! Thurs: I need your help in setting up the ultimate bracket: Picking the ideal seminar speaker Fri: When a study fails to replicate: let’s be fair and open-minded Sat: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Twelve posts from 2014 that deserve a second look

January 12, 2015
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Twelve posts from 2014 that deserve a second look

I began 2015 by compiling a list of popular articles from my blog in 2014. Although this "People's Choice" list contains many interesting articles, some of my favorites did not make the list. Today I present the "Editor's Choice" list of articles that deserve a second look. I've highlighted one […]

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“Only those samples which fit the model best in cross validation were included” (whistleblower) “I suspect that we likely disagree with what constitutes validation” (Potti and Nevins)

January 12, 2015
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“Only those samples which fit the model best in cross validation were included” (whistleblower) “I suspect that we likely disagree with what constitutes validation” (Potti and Nevins)

So it turns out there was an internal whistleblower in the Potti scandal at Duke after all (despite denials by the Duke researchers involved ). It was a medical student Brad Perez. It’s in the Jan. 9, 2015 Cancer Letter*. Ever since my first post on Potti last May (part 1), I’ve received various e-mails and phone calls from people wishing to confide their inside […]

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The State of Information Visualization, 2015

January 12, 2015
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It seems to be a foregone conclusion that 2014 was not an exciting year in visualization. When we recorded the Data Stories episode looking back at 2014 last week (to be released soon), everybody started out with a bit of a downer. But plenty of things happened, and they point to even more new developments in 2015. If this … Continue reading The State of Information Visualization, 2015

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Econometrics vs. Ad Hoc Empiricism

January 11, 2015
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Econometrics vs. Ad Hoc Empiricism

In a post in 2013, titled "Let's Put the "ECON" Back Into Microeconometrics", I complained about some of the nonsense that is passed off as "applied econometrics". Specifically, I was upset about the disconnect between the economic model (if there is o...

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Some Applications of Item Response Theory in R

January 11, 2015
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Some Applications of Item Response Theory in R

The typical introduction to item response theory (IRT) positions the technique as a form of curve fitting. We believe that a latent continuous variable is responsible for the observed dichotomous or polytomous responses to a set of items (e.g., multipl...

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Mostly Harmless Econometrics?

January 11, 2015
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I've had Angrist-Pischke's Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion (MHE) for a while, but I just got around to reading it. (By the way, a lower-level follow-up was just published.)There's a lot to like about MHE. It'...

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“Epidemiology and Biostatistics: competitive or complementary?”

January 11, 2015
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Mohammad Mansournia writes: I have a 20 minute lecture on “Epidemiology and Biostatistics: competitive or complementary?” at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in the next month. I should mention the difference between an epidemiologist and a biostatistician and their competitive or complementary roles in public health. I am wondering if you have any thoughts on […] The post “Epidemiology and Biostatistics: competitive or complementary?” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Multivariate analysis of death rate on the map of Europe

January 11, 2015
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Multivariate analysis of death rate on the map of Europe

Eurostat has information on death rates by cause and NUTS 2 region. I am trying to get this visually displayed on the map. To get there I map all causes to three dimensions via a principal components analysis. These three dimensions are subsequently tr...

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Wow—this is much more impressive than anything Frank Flynn ever did!

January 11, 2015
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This is what I call a rogue sociologist. The post Wow—this is much more impressive than anything Frank Flynn ever did! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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