Looking at Measles Data in Project Tycho

March 30, 2014
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Looking at Measles Data in Project Tycho

Project Tycho includes data from all weekly notifiable disease reports for the United States dating back to 1888. These data are freely available to anybody interested. I wanted to play around with the data a bit, so I registered.MeaslesMeasles a...

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References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling

March 29, 2014
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A student writes: I am new to Bayesian methods. While I am reading your book, I have some questions for you. I am interested in doing Bayesian hierarchical (multi-level) linear regression (e.g., random-intercept model) and Bayesian structural equation modeling (SEM)—for causality. Do you happen to know if I could find some articles, where authors could […]The post References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling appeared…

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I agree with this comment

March 29, 2014
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The anonymous commenter puts it well: The problem is simple, the researchers are disproving always false null hypotheses and taking this disproof as near proof that their theory is correct. The post I agree with this comment appeared first on Statistic...

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Crime map for the City of London

March 29, 2014
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Crime map for the City of London

In my experience, central London is generally a safe place, but I was robbed there two years ago. A friend and I got lost on our way to a pancake house (serving, not made of), so I took my new iPhone out to consult a map. In a flash, a bicyclist zoomed past and plucked my […]

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Severe osteometric probing of skeletal remains: John Byrd

March 28, 2014
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Severe osteometric probing of skeletal remains: John Byrd

John E. Byrd, Ph.D. D-ABFA Central Identification Laboratory JPAC Guest, March 27, PHil 6334 “Statistical Considerations of the Histomorphometric Test Protocol for Determination of Human Origin of Skeletal Remains”  By: John E. Byrd, Ph.D...

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Alternatives to model diagnostics for statistical inference?

March 28, 2014
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Alternatives to model diagnostics for statistical inference?

Consider the problem of making statistical inferences, as opposed to predictions. The product of statistical inference is a probabilistic statement about a population quantity, for example a 100(1-)% confidence interval for a population median. In this context, the principal reason for diagnostics is to comfort ourselves about the quality of such inferences. For example, we […]

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Nate Silver and the Krugman Embarrassment

March 28, 2014
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I'm happy that Nate Silver and his FiveThirtyEight are back. Nate generally provides interesting and responsible data-based journalism for the educated layperson. (Of course he sometimes gets in over his head, but don't we all?)Now Krugman suddenl...

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Creating a Lenin-style democracy

March 28, 2014
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Mark Palko explains why a penalty for getting the wrong answer on a test (the SAT, which is used in college admissions and which is used in the famous 8 schools example) is not a “penalty for guessing.” Then the very next day he catches this from Todd Balf in the New York Times Magazine: […]The post Creating a Lenin-style democracy appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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What happened to the world we knew?

March 28, 2014
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I was unlocking my bike, with music turned on low, and a couple of high school kids were lounging around nearby. One of them walked over and asked, « Qui est-ce qui chante? ». I responded, “Stevie Wonder” (not trying any accent on this ...

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Dissecting charts from a Big Data study

March 28, 2014
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Dissecting charts from a Big Data study

Today's post examines an example of Big Data analyses, submitted by a reader, Daniel T. The link to the analysis is here. (On the sister blog, I discussed the nature of this type of analysis. This post concerns the graphical...

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Why use R? Five reasons.

March 28, 2014
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Why use R? Five reasons.

In this post I will go through 5 reasons: zero cost, crazy popularity, awesome power, dazzling flexibility, and mind-blowing support. I believe R is the best statistical programming language to learn. As a blogger who has contributed over 150 posts in Stata and over 100 in R I have extensive experience with both a proprietary statistical programming language as well as the open source alternative.  In my graduate career I have…

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Bayesian Data Analysis [BDA3]

March 27, 2014
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Bayesian Data Analysis [BDA3]

Andrew Gelman and his coauthors, John Carlin, Hal Stern, David Dunson, Aki Vehtari, and Don Rubin, have now published the latest edition of their book Bayesian Data Analysis. David and Aki are newcomers to the authors’ list, with an extended section on non-linear and non-parametric models. I have been asked by Sam Behseta to write […]

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Bouncing Graphic Replays Human Heartbeat Dynamics of Yesterday

March 27, 2014
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Bouncing Graphic Replays Human Heartbeat Dynamics of Yesterday

One Human Heartbeat [onehumanheartbeat.com] by data scientist and communicator Jen Lowe displays the dynamics of Jen's heartbeat from about one day ago. The data is captured by a Basis B1 band, which is able to detect one's heart rate by measuring t...

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Beyond the Valley of the Trolls

March 27, 2014
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Beyond the Valley of the Trolls

In a further discussion of the discussion about the discussion of a paper in Administrative Science Quarterly, Thomas Basbøll writes: I [Basbøll] feel “entitled”, if that’s the right word (actually, I’d say I feel privileged), to express my opinions to anyone who wants to listen, and while I think it does say something about an […]The post Beyond the Valley of the Trolls appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Dealing with adapted data

March 27, 2014
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Reader Daniel T. is unhappy about this analysis of the intraday Internet usage by OS and device types. He doesn't like their choice of index, which I'll get to in a second post. (Link appears here when ready.) There is something else wrong with this type of analysis. Let's do a thought experiment. If you are a marketer interested in the diurnal variability in Internet usage, what are some of…

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Phil 6334:Misspecification Testing: Ordering From A Full Diagnostic Menu (part 1)

March 27, 2014
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Phil 6334:Misspecification Testing: Ordering From A Full Diagnostic Menu (part 1)

 We’re going to be discussing the philosophy of m-s testing today in our seminar, so I’m reblogging this from Feb. 2012. I’ve linked the 3 follow-ups below. Check the original posts for some good discussion. (Note visitor*) “This is the kind of cure that kills the patient!” is the line of Aris Spanos that I […]

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Seasonal Unit Roots

March 27, 2014
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As discussed in the MAT8181 course, there are – at least – two kinds of non-stationary time series: those with a trend, and those with a unit-root (they will be called integrated). Unit root tests cannot be used to assess whether a time ser...

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New research journal on observational studies

March 26, 2014
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Dylan Small writes: I am starting an observational studies journal that aims to publish papers on all aspects of observational studies, including study protocols for observational studies, methodologies for observational studies, descriptions of data sets for observational studies, software for observational studies and analyses of observational studies. One of the goals of the journal is […]The post New research journal on observational studies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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MCMC for Econometrics Students – IV

March 26, 2014
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MCMC for Econometrics Students – IV

This is the fourth in a sequence of posts designed to introduce econometrics students to the use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC, or MC2) simulation methods for Bayesian inference. The first three posts can be found here, here, and here, and I'll ass...

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Big Data Without Statisticians: BD2K Symposium At UCLA

March 26, 2014
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UCLA is having a big data conference on Thursday and Friday Mar 27, 28 2014.  The conference is organized by four computer science and genomic biology types. Speakers cluster [one of the rare appropriate uses of cluster analysis I know of] into three...

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Big Data Without Statisticians: BD2K Symposium At UCLA

March 26, 2014
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UCLA is having a big data conference on Thursday and Friday Mar 27, 28 2014.  The conference is organized by four computer science and genomic biology types. Speakers cluster [one of the rare appropriate uses of cluster analysis I know of] into three...

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A non-comprehensive comparison of prominent data science programs on cost and frequency.

March 26, 2014
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A non-comprehensive comparison of prominent data science programs on cost and frequency.

We did a really brief comparison of a few notable data science programs for a grant submission we were working on. I thought it was pretty fascinating, so I'm posting it here. A couple of notes about the table. 1. Our … Continue reading →

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Is a steal really worth 9 points?

March 26, 2014
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Is a steal really worth 9 points?

Theodore Vasiloudis writes: I’d like to bring your attention to this article by Benjamin Morris discussing the value of steals for the NBA. The author argues that a steal should be a highly sought after statistic as it equates to higher chances of victory and is very hard to replace when a player is injured. […]The post Is a steal really worth 9 points? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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