Data Stories starring Tamara Munzner

December 29, 2014
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The latest episode of the Data Stories podcast has Tamara Munzner as the guest. They talk about her much-anticipated book, visualization taxonomies, and a lot more. It’s a great episode, well worth listening to.

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To raise the power of a test is to lower (not raise) the “hurdle” for rejecting the null (Ziliac and McCloskey 3 years on)

December 29, 2014
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To raise the power of a test is to lower (not raise) the “hurdle” for rejecting the null (Ziliac and McCloskey 3 years on)

I said I’d reblog one of the 3-year “memory lane” posts marked in red, with a few new comments (in burgundy), from time to time. So let me comment on one referring to Ziliac and McCloskey on power. (from Oct.2011). I would think they’d want to correct some wrong statements, or explain their shifts in meaning. My hope is […]

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Econometrics in the Post-Cowles Era

December 28, 2014
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Econometrics in the Post-Cowles Era

My thanks to Olav Bjerkholt for alerting me to a special edition of the open access journal, Oekonomia, devoted to the History of Econometrics. Olav recently guest-edited this issue, and here's part of what he has to say in the Editor's Forew...

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Christmas release: ggRandomForests V1.1.2

December 28, 2014
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Christmas release: ggRandomForests V1.1.2

I’ve posted a new release of the ggRandomForests: Visually Exploring Random Forests to CRAN at (http://cran.r-project.org/package=ggRandomForests) The biggest news is the inclusion of some holiday reading – a ggRandomForests package vignette! ggRandomForests: Visually Exploring a Random Forest for Regression The vignette… Continue reading →

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Sometimes you’re so subtle they don’t get the joke

December 28, 2014
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T. A. Frail writes: When Andrew Gelman, a professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University, wrote that Who’s Bigger? ‘is a guaranteed argument-starter,’ he meant it as a compliment. In all seriousness, I wish people would read what I wrote, not what they think I meant! My quote continued: This book is a […] The post Sometimes you’re so subtle they don’t get the joke appeared first on…

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A time series contest attempt

December 28, 2014
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A time series contest attempt

I saw the post a time series contest on Rob J Hyndman's blog. Since I am still wanting to play around with some bigger data sets, so I went to the source website https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0BxmzB6Xm7Ga1MGxsdlMxbGllZnM&usp=shar...

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Are you hardcore?

December 27, 2014
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Are you hardcore?

Keep warm while cycling in the winter months with these tips from the Dataman! (tl; dr invest in warm gloves and cotton socks)

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The Demise of a "Great Ratio"

December 27, 2014
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The Demise of a "Great Ratio"

Once upon a time there was a rule of thumb that there were 20 sheep in New Zealand for every person living there. Yep, I kid you not. The old adage used to be "3 million people; 60 million sheep".I liked to think of this as another important "Great Rat...

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The anti-Woodstein

December 27, 2014
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I received the following email: Dear professor Andrew Gelman, My name is **, a resident correspondent of **. I am writing to request for an interview via email. We met once at New York Foreign Press Center one week ago. As you may know, President Obama will travel to China, Burma and Australia from November […] The post The anti-Woodstein appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Try answering this question without heading to Wikipedia

December 27, 2014
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Phil writes: This is kind of fun (at least for me): You would probably guess, correctly, that membership in the US Chess Federation is lower than its peak. Guess the year of peak membership, and the decline (as a percentage) in the number of members from that peak. My reply: I don’t know, but I’d […] The post Try answering this question without heading to Wikipedia appeared first on Statistical…

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3 YEARS AGO: MONTHLY (Dec.) MEMORY LANE

December 27, 2014
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3 YEARS AGO: MONTHLY (Dec.) MEMORY LANE

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: December 2011. I mark in red 3 posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.* (12/2) Getting Credit (or blame) for Something You Don’t Deserve (and first honorable mention [to C. Robert]) (12/6) Putting the Brakes on the Breakthrough Part 1* (12/7) Part II: Breaking Through the Breakthrough* (12/11) Irony and Bad Faith: Deconstructing Bayesians […]

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I’m sure that my anti-Polya attitude is completely unfair

December 26, 2014
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Reading this post in which Mark Palko quotes from the classic “How to Solve It” by the legendary mathematician and math educator George Polya, I was reminded of my decades-long aversion to Polya, an attitude that might seem odd given that (a) Polya has an excellent reputation, and (b) I’ve never read more than a […] The post I’m sure that my anti-Polya attitude is completely unfair appeared first on…

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Common sense and statistics

December 25, 2014
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John Cook writes: Some physicists say that you should always have an order-of-magnitude idea of what a result will be before you calculate it. This implies a belief that such estimates are usually possible, and that they provide a sanity check for calculations. And that’s true in physics, at least in mechanics. In probability, however, […] The post Common sense and statistics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Sheep tramples sense

December 25, 2014
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Sheep tramples sense

Merry Christmas, readers. *** A Twitter follower pointed me to this visual: I have yet to understand why the vertical axis of the top chart keeps changing scales over time. The white dot labelled "Peak 1982" (70 million) is barely...

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R: Principal Component Analysis on Imaging

December 25, 2014
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R: Principal Component Analysis on Imaging

Ever wonder what's the mathematics behind face recognition on most gadgets like digital camera and smartphones? Well for most part it has something to do with statistics. One statistical tool that is capable of doing such feature is the Principal Compo...

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Proxy unmasking

December 25, 2014
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Consider this paragraph from a FiveThirtyEight article about the small-schools movement (my italics): Hanushek calculated the economic value of good and bad teachers, combining the “quality” of a teacher — based on student achievement on tests — with the lifetime earnings of an average American entering the workforce. He found that a very high-performing teacher with a class of 20 students could raise her pupils’ average lifetime earnings by as…

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Visualizing APA 6 Citations: qdapRegex 0.2.0 & qdapTools 1.1.0

December 24, 2014
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Visualizing APA 6 Citations: qdapRegex 0.2.0 & qdapTools 1.1.0

qdapRegex 0.2.0 & qdapTools 1.1.0 have been released to CRAN.  This post will provide some of the packages’ updates/features and provide an integrate demonstration of extracting and viewing in-text APA 6 style citations from an MS Word (.docx) document. qdapRegex … Continue reading →

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Trajectories of Achievement Within Race/Ethnicity: “Catching Up” in Achievement Across Time

December 24, 2014
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Just in time for Christmas, here’s some good news for kids, from Pamela Davis-Kean and Justin Jager: The achievement gap has long been the focus of educational research, policy, and intervention. The authors took a new approach to examining the achievement gap by examining achievement trajectories within each racial group. To identify these trajectories they […] The post Trajectories of Achievement Within Race/Ethnicity: “Catching Up” in Achievement Across Time appeared…

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Di Cook is moving to Monash

December 24, 2014
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Di Cook is moving to Monash

I’m delighted that Professor Dianne Cook will be joining Monash University in July 2015 as a Professor of Business Analytics. Di is an Australian who has worked in the US for the past 25 years, mostly at Iowa State University. She is moving back to Australia and joining the Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics in the […]

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All I want for Chrismukkah is that critics & “reformers” quit howlers of testing (after 3 yrs of blogging)! So here’s Aris Spanos “Tallking Back!”

December 24, 2014
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All I want for Chrismukkah is that critics & “reformers” quit howlers of testing (after 3 yrs of blogging)! So here’s Aris Spanos “Tallking Back!”

  This was initially posted as slides from our joint Spring 2014 seminar: “Talking Back to the Critics Using Error Statistics”. (You can enlarge them.) Related reading is Mayo and Spanos (2011) Filed under: Error Statistics, fallacy of rejection, Phil6334, reforming the reformers, Statistics

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Using statistics to make the world a better place?

December 23, 2014
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Using statistics to make the world a better place?

In a recent discussion involving our frustration with crap research, Daniel Lakeland wrote: I [Lakeland] really do worry about a world in which social and institutional and similar effects keep us plugging away at a certain kind of cargo-cult science that produces lots of publishable papers and makes it easier to get funding for projects […] The post Using statistics to make the world a better place? appeared first on…

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Review: Wainer, Picturing the Uncertain World

December 23, 2014
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Picturing the Uncertain World by Howard Wainer is a book about statistics and statistical thinking, aided by visual depictions of data. Each article in the collection starts by stating a question or phenomenon, which is then investigated further using some clever statistics. I bought the book after Scott Murray pointed me to it as the source … Continue reading Review: Wainer, Picturing the Uncertain World

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Cloudy and red

December 23, 2014
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Cloudy and red

Note: I'm traveling during the holidays so updates will be infrequent. Reader Daniel L. pointed me to a blog post discussing the following weather map: The author claimed that many readers misinterpreted the red color as meaning high temperatures when...

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