Garry is 50 years old. He is a chess player who is also active in a political movement.

December 2, 2015
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Garry is 50 years old.  He is a chess player who is also active in a political movement.

You all know about Linda, that now-retired bank teller who back in the 1970s was active in the feminist movement. Even if she never had any formal political experience before this activity, Linda might well have had a talent for politics. Garry is in the opposite situation: he’s had several political opportunities since his rise […] The post Garry is 50 years old. He is a chess player who is…

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What you learned and not learned about machine learning

December 2, 2015
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What you learned and not learned about machine learning

My friend Liliane pointed me to this HBR article about "machine learning." (link) As a basic introduction, the article is pretty good. Here are 3 things you learned and 2 things you didn't learn from this article. 3 Things You Learned Machine learning is not the same as learning as you know it. At the end of step 5 ("Iterate"), the author proudly states "It has learned." But what does…

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Reviewers and open science: why PRO?

December 2, 2015
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Reviewers and open science: why PRO?

As of yesterday, our paper outlining the PRO Initiative for open science was accepted for publication in the journal Royal Society Open Science. It marks the end of many tweaks to the basic idea, and hopefully the beginning of a new era in peer reviewi...

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Eurostat Forecasting Competition Deadline Approaching

December 2, 2015
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I have some serious reservations about forecasting competitions, at least as typically implemented by groups like Kaggle. But still they're useful and exciting and absolutely fascinating. Here's a timely call for participation, from Eurostat. (Act...

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Arrange matrices and graphs in a gridded layout

December 2, 2015
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Arrange matrices and graphs in a gridded layout

Last week my colleague Chris Hemedinger published a blog post that described how to use the ODS LAYOUT GRIDDED statement to arrange tables and graphs in a panel. The statement was introduced in SAS 9.4m1 (December 2013). Gridded layout is supported for HTML, POWERPOINT, and the PRINTER family of destinations […] The post Arrange matrices and graphs in a gridded layout appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Review: Munroe’s Thing Explainer and Pinker’s Sense of Style

December 2, 2015
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Review: Munroe’s Thing Explainer and Pinker’s Sense of Style

Bad writing and the inability to explain in terms normal people can understand are the hallmarks of academic writing. Here are two books every academic should read and take to heart to be able to recognize bad prose and learn how to fix it. Randall Munroe, Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Terms Munroe is the guy … Continue reading Review: Munroe’s Thing Explainer and Pinker’s Sense of Style

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What was data science before it was called data science?

December 2, 2015
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What was data science before it was called data science?

“Data Science” is obviously a trendy term making it way through the hype cycle. Either nobody is good enough to be a data scientist (unicorns) or everybody is too good to be a data scientist (or the truth is somewhere in the middle). Gartner hype cycle (Wikipedia). And there is a quarter that grumbles that … Continue reading What was data science before it was called data science?

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Symposium on Population Inference at Johns Hopkins University, Friday February 26, 2016

December 1, 2015
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Liz Stuart announces this conference: The Department of Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is pleased to announce the Inaugural Ross-Royall Symposium focused on population inference, to be held on Friday February 26, 2016 in Baltimore, MD. This year’s symposium, “From Individuals to Populations” will highlight recent advances in statistical methods […] The post Symposium on Population Inference at Johns Hopkins University, Friday February 26, 2016…

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Thinking like a statistician: the importance of investigator-initiated grants

December 1, 2015
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Thinking like a statistician: the importance of investigator-initiated grants

A substantial amount of scientific research is funded by investigator-initiated grants. A researcher has an idea, writes it up and sends a proposal to a funding agency. The agency then elicits help from a group of peers to evaluate competing proposals. Grants are awarded to the most highly ranked ideas. The percent awarded depends on how

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How does Brad Cooper analyze hierarchical survey data with post-stratification?

December 1, 2015
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Laura Holder writes: I am working on a project involving a large survey data set and am interested in applying a model-based approach in the context of post-stratification (as you frequently discuss). I’m attempting to determine the most suitable approach for my circumstance. The data set I am working with is collected via a two […] The post How does Brad Cooper analyze hierarchical survey data with post-stratification? appeared first…

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Notes from Warsaw R meetup

December 1, 2015
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Notes from Warsaw R meetup

I had the great pleasure time to attend the Warsaw R meetup last Thursday. The organisers Olga Mierzwa and Przemyslaw Biecek had put together an event with a focus on R in Insurance (btw, there is a conference with the same name), discussing examples o...

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Internet use and religion, part five

November 30, 2015
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Internet use and religion, part five

[If you are jumping into the middle of this series, you might want to start with this article, which explains the methodological approach I am taking.]In the previous article, I show results from two regression models that predict religious affiliation...

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7 tips for work-life balance

November 30, 2015
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7 tips for work-life balance

A student writes in: Dear Sherri: I am **, a PhD student in ** in ** University. I am trying to work productively. For example, I tried to use some todo list software, such as, remember the milk and omnifocus, and read related books. But feeling of overwhelming happens every day, and no achievements were […] The post 7 tips for work-life balance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics

November 30, 2015
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Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics

When creating a statistical graphic such as a line plot or a scatter plot, it is sometimes important to preserve the aspect ratio of the data. For example, if the range of the X and Y variables are equal, it can be useful to display the data in a square […] The post Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics appeared first on The DO…

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The hidden benefits of open-source software

November 29, 2015
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The hidden benefits of open-source software

I’ve been having discussions with colleagues and university administration about the best way for universities to manage home-grown software. The traditional business model for software is that we build software and sell it to everyone willi...

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The hidden benefits of open-source software

November 29, 2015
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The hidden benefits of open-source software

I’ve been having discussions with colleagues and university administration about the best way for universities to manage home-grown software. The traditional business model for software is that we build software and sell it to everyone willing to pay. Very often, that leads to a software company spin-off that has little or nothing to do with the university that nurtured the […]

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Comedy book with surefire can’t-miss formula, misses

November 29, 2015
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The other day at the library I noticed a pink-covered book, “We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy.” It was filled with interviews. Cool! I checked it out and . . . jeez was it boring. It’s hard to imagine you could interview a bunch of comedians and come up with something so […] The post Comedy book with surefire can’t-miss formula, misses appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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The proliferation of useless data

November 29, 2015
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One of the secrets of great data analysis is thoughtful data collection. Great data collection is necessary but not sufficient for great data analysis. I recently had the unfortunate need to select a new doctor. Every time I had to do this, it has been an exercise in frustration and desperation. And after wasting hours and hours perusing the "data" on doctors, inevitably I give up and just throw a…

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Attention please!

November 29, 2015
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Attention please!

They all use statistics …  in the media, in politics, in sports. But they mostly forget that statistics, especially official statistics, are made by professionals in a quite demanding, time- and resource-consuming process. The WO/MAN-IN-THE-MIDDLE, the professionals, providing information and knowledge from facts remain hidden (despite Googles’ statement that statistician will be ‘the sexy job in … Continue reading Attention please!

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Wind in Netherlands II

November 29, 2015
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Wind in Netherlands II

Two weeks ago I plotted how wind measurements on the edge of the North Sea changed in the past century. This week the same dataset is used for hypothesis testing.DataThe most important things to reiterate from previous post is that the data is from KNM...

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Additional thoughts about ‘Lorenz curves’ to compare models

November 29, 2015
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Additional thoughts about ‘Lorenz curves’ to compare models

A few month ago, I did mention a graph, of some so-called Lorenz curves to compare regression models, see e.g. Progressive’s slides (thanks Guillaume for the reference) The idea is simple. Consider some model for the pure premium (in insurance, it is the quantity that we like to model), i.e. the conditional expected valeur On some dataset, we have our predictions, as well as observed quantities, . The curve are obtained simply…

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Return to the Comedy Hour: P-values vs posterior probabilities (1)

November 29, 2015
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Return to the Comedy Hour: P-values vs posterior probabilities (1)

Some recent criticisms of statistical tests of significance have breathed brand new life into some very old howlers, many of which have been discussed on this blog. One variant that returns to the scene every decade I think (for 50+ years?), takes a “disagreement on numbers” to show a problem with significance tests even from a “frequentist” perspective.  Since it’s […]

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We got mooks

November 28, 2015
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We got mooks

Columbia University’s Data Science Institute is releasing some mooks, and I’m part of it. I’ll first give the official announcement and then share some of my thoughts. The official announcement: The Data Science Institute at Columbia University is excited to announce the launch of its first online-education series, Data Science and Analytics in Context, on […] The post We got mooks appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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