Binary heart in SAS

February 11, 2015
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Binary heart in SAS

The xkcd comic often makes me think and laugh. The comic features physics, math, and statistics among its topics. Many years ago, the comic showed a "binary heart": a grid of binary (0/1) numbers with the certain numbers colored red so that they formed a heart. Some years later, I […]

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Scheduling R Tasks via Windows Task Scheduler

February 11, 2015
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Scheduling R Tasks via Windows Task Scheduler

This post will allow you to impress your boss with your strong work ethic by enabling Windows R users to schedule late night tasks.  Picture it, your boss gets an email at 1:30 in the morning with the latest company … Continue reading →

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Scheduling R Tasks via Windows Task Scheduler

February 11, 2015
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Scheduling R Tasks via Windows Task Scheduler

This post will allow you to impress your boss with your strong work ethic by enabling Windows R users to schedule late night tasks.  Picture it, your boss gets an email at 1:30 in the morning with the latest company … Continue reading →

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BayesFactorExtras: a sneak preview

February 10, 2015
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Felix Schönbrodt and I have been working on an R package called BayesFactorExtras. This package is designed to work with the BayesFactor package, providing features beyond the core BayesFactor functionality. Currently in the package are:Sequential Bay...

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“When Do Stories Work? Evidence and Illustration in the Social Sciences”: My talk in the Harvard sociology dept this Thurs noon

February 10, 2015
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Stories are central to social science. It might be pleasant to consider stories as mere adornments and explications of theories that we develop and evaluate via formal data collection, but it seems that all of us—including statisticians!—rely on stories to develop our understanding of the social world. And therein lies a paradox: stories are valued […] The post “When Do Stories Work? Evidence and Illustration in the Social Sciences”: My…

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Albert Camus (1) vs. Bruno Latour

February 10, 2015
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Yesterday‘s winner: Thomas Kinkade. It was a tough call. Duchamp is far more impressive both as an artist and as an intellectual, but, as Jonathan put it in the very first comment in the thread: Duchamp has nothing to teach in an academic seminar: epater les bourgeois, reconceptualize art in a time of technological change, […] The post Albert Camus (1) vs. Bruno Latour appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism

February 10, 2015
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In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism

OK, here’s a research project for you. From this recent blog comment, I learned about Mustapha Marrouchi, a professor of literature who has plagiarized from various writers, including the noted academic entertainer Slavoj Zizek. Amusing, given that Zizek himself has been caught plagiarizing. Zizek copied from Stanley Hornbeck. Did Hornbeck plagiarize from anyone else? Probably […] The post In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism appeared first on Statistical…

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Bayesian analysis of match rates on Tinder

February 10, 2015
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Bayesian analysis of match rates on Tinder

Last fall I taught an introduction to Bayesian statistics at Olin College. My students worked on some excellent projects, and I invited them to write up their results as guest articles for this blog. Just in time for Valentine's Day, here's the secon...

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What have a physicist, an entrepreneur and an actor in common?

February 10, 2015
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What have a physicist, an entrepreneur and an actor in common?

They all try to do something new and take the risk to be seen as a fool.Over the last few days I stumbled over three videos by a physicist, an entrepreneur and an actor, which at first have little in common, but they do. They all need to know when they...

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What’s wrong with taking (1 – β)/α, as a likelihood ratio comparing H0 and H1?

February 10, 2015
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What’s wrong with taking (1 – β)/α, as a likelihood ratio comparing H0 and H1?

Here’s a quick note on something that I often find in discussions on tests, even though it treats “power”, which is a capacity-of-test notion, as if it were a fit-with-data notion….. 1. Take a one-sided Normal test T+: with n iid samples: H0: µ ≤  0 against H1: µ >  0 σ = 10,  n = 100,  σ/√n =σx= 1,  α = […]

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The trouble with evaluating anything

February 10, 2015
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It is very hard to evaluate people's productivity or work in any meaningful way. This problem is the source of: Consternation about peer review The reason why post publication peer review doesn't work Consternation about faculty evaluation Major problems at companies like Yahoo and Microsoft. Roger and I were just talking about this problem in the

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Thanks Paul and welcome Dilek

February 9, 2015
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Thanks Paul and welcome Dilek

Today, there is a change in editors at the International Journal of Forecasting. Paul Goodwin is retiring from the editorial board, and Dilek Önkal is taking his place. Paul Goodwin was appointed as an associate editor in 1999 and as an editor in 2010. Paul is retiring from his position as Professor of Management Science […]

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Numbersense, in Chinese and Japanese

February 9, 2015
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Numbersense, in Chinese and Japanese

This is a cross-post on my two blogs. The new year brings news that my second book, Numbersense: How to Use Big Data to Your Advantage has been translated into Chinese (simplified) and Japanese. Here are the book covers: In...

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Numbersense, in Chinese and Japanese

February 9, 2015
By
Numbersense, in Chinese and Japanese

This is a cross-post on my two blogs. The new year brings news that my second book, Numbersense: How to Use Big Data to Your Advantage has been translated into Chinese (simplified) and Japanese. Here are the book covers: In Chinese, the title reads: ...

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Marcel Duchamp (4) vs. Thomas Kinkade

February 9, 2015
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Marcel Duchamp (4) vs. Thomas Kinkade

The winner of yesterday‘s bout is Thoreau. The best pro-Thoreau argument came from JRC: “This one breaks down to to whose narrative on loneliness and solitude is more interesting: the guy who removed himself from society, or the guy forcibly removed from it. Lifetime probability of incarceration and homelessness seems in the same ballpark, so […] The post Marcel Duchamp (4) vs. Thomas Kinkade appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of writing

February 9, 2015
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Following up on my discussion of Steven Pinker’s writing advice, Pinker and I had an email exchange that cleared up some issues and raised some new ones. In particular, Pinker made a connection between the difficulty of writing and some research findings in cognitive psychology. I think this connection is really cool—I’ve been thinking and […] The post Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of…

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On deck this week

February 9, 2015
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Mon: Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of writing Marcel Duchamp (4) vs. Thomas Kinkade Tues: In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism Albert Camus (1) vs. Bruno Latour Wed: When the evidence is unclear Leonardo da Vinci (1) vs. The guy who did Piss Christ Thurs: Two Unrecognized […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Prior exposure: Bayesian data analysis workshops (ESRC Advanced Training Initiative)

February 9, 2015
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Prior exposure: Bayesian data analysis workshops (ESRC Advanced Training Initiative)

Mark Andrews and I have just launched the web site for our Prior Exposure Bayesian Data Analysis workshop series. This is part of the ESRC Advanced Training Initiative.Further details are available here.The first two workshops are available for booking...

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Light entertainment: another use of the scatter plot

February 9, 2015
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Light entertainment: another use of the scatter plot

Courtesy of reader Chris P. A little word play on Tumblr.

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Optimizely Stats Engine 2: what about advanced users?

February 9, 2015
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Optimizely Stats Engine 2: what about advanced users?

In Part 1, I covered the logic behind recent changes to the statistical analysis used in standard reports by Optimizely. In Part 2, I ponder what this change means for more sophisticated customers--those who are following the proper protocols for classical design of experiments, such as running tests of predetermined sample sizes, adjusting for multiple comparisons, and constructing and analyzing multivariate tests using regression with interactions. For this segment, the…

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MissData 2015 in Rennes [June 18-19]

February 9, 2015
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MissData 2015 in Rennes [June 18-19]

This (early) summer, a conference on missing data will be organised in Rennes, Brittany, with the support of the French Statistical Society [SFDS]. (Check the website if interested, Rennes is a mere two hours from Paris by fast train.)Filed under: R, ...

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CFP: 13th Australasian Data Mining Conference (AusDM 2015)

February 9, 2015
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CFP: 13th Australasian Data Mining Conference (AusDM 2015)

The 13th Australasian Data Mining Conference (AusDM 2015) Sydney, Australia, 8-9 August 2015 co-located with SIGKDD’15 URL: http://ausdm15.ausdm.org/ Join us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/AusDM-4907891 The Australasian Data Mining Conference has established itself as the premier Australasian meeting for both practitioners and … Continue reading →

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Creating an array of matrices

February 9, 2015
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Creating an array of matrices

The SAS DATA step supports multidimensional arrays. However, matrices in SAS/IML are like mathematical matrices: they are always two dimensional. In simulation studies you might need to generate and store thousands of matrices for a later statistical analysis of their properties. How can you accomplish that unless you can create […]

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