These are the statistics papers you just have to read

March 4, 2015
By

Here. And here. Just kidding. Here’s the real story. Susanna Makela writes: A few of us want to start a journal club for the statistics PhD students. The idea is to read important papers that we might not otherwise read, maybe because they’re not directly related to our area of research/we don’t have time/etc. What […] The post These are the statistics papers you just have to read appeared first…

Read more »

An easy way to approximate a cumulative distribution function

March 4, 2015
By
An easy way to approximate a cumulative distribution function

Evaluating a cumulative distribution function (CDF) can be an expensive operation. Each time you evaluate the CDF for a continuous probability distribution, the software has to perform a numerical integration. (Recall that the CDF at a point x is the integral under the probability density function (PDF) where x is […] The post An easy way to approximate a cumulative distribution function appeared first on The DO Loop.

Read more »

Nominations for best International Journal of Forecasting paper, 2012–2013

March 4, 2015
By
Nominations for best International Journal of Forecasting paper, 2012–2013

Every two years, the International Journal of Forecasting awards a prize for the best paper published in a two year period. It is now time to identify the best paper published in the IJF during 2012 and 2013. There is always about 18 months delay after the publication period to allow time for reflection, citations, […]

Read more »

Tents, Tweets, and Events: Ongoing Protests and Social Media

March 3, 2015
By

Our paper, entitled Tents, Tweets, and Events: The Interplay Between Ongoing Protests and Social Media, written with Marco Toledo Bastos (aka @toledobastos) and Dan Mercea (aka @DanMercea) just appeared in the Journal of Communication Recent protest movements have fuelled deliberations about the extent to which social media ignite protests. In this paper we compare time-series data of Twitter, Facebook, and onsite protest activity to test the hypothesis of Granger-causality between social media streams…

Read more »

George Carlin (2) vs. Barbara Kruger

March 3, 2015
By
George Carlin (2) vs. Barbara Kruger

To decide yesterday‘s contest, I’ll have to point to Jeremy’s comment: Rembrandt in a walk: -He believes that “God is in every leaf on every tree”. Most of his greatest paintings are portraits of himself or regular people (as opposed to portraits of kings or Popes, or mythical battles, or etc.) Same for his etchings. […] The post George Carlin (2) vs. Barbara Kruger appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

The elements of data analytic style – so much for a soft launch

March 3, 2015
By
The elements of data analytic style – so much for a soft launch

Editor's note: I wrote a book called Elements of Data Analytic Style. Buy it on Leanpub or Amazon! If you buy it on Leanpub, you get all updates (there are likely to be some) for free and you can pay what you want (including zero) but the author would be appreciative if you'd throw a

Read more »

One simple trick to make Stan run faster

March 3, 2015
By

Did you know that Stan automatically runs in parallel (and caches compiled models) from R if you do this: source(“http://mc-stan.org/rstan/stan.R”) It’s from Stan core developer Ben Goodrich. This simple line of code has changed my li...

Read more »

Inverting the axis for goodness sake

March 3, 2015
By
Inverting the axis for goodness sake

Last week, Wall Street Journal inverted the vertical axis in one of their charts. The last time someone did this, a huge uproar ensued. (The Florida gun deaths chart discussed here.) This time, the act appeared to have caused barely...

Read more »

Next Kölner R User Meeting: Friday, 6 March 2015

March 3, 2015
By
Next Kölner R User Meeting: Friday, 6 March 2015

The next Cologne R user group meeting is scheduled for this Friday, 6 March 2015 and we have an exciting agenda with two talks, followed by networking drinks:Using R in Excel via R.NETGünter Faes and Matthias SpixMS Office and Excel are the 'de-facto'...

Read more »

Introducing shinyStan

March 2, 2015
By
Introducing shinyStan

As a project for Andrew’s Statistical Communication and Graphics graduate course at Columbia, a few of us (Michael Andreae, Yuanjun Gao, Dongying Song, and I) had the goal of giving RStan’s print and plot functions a makeover. We ended up getting a bit carried away and instead we designed a graphical user interface for interactively exploring virtually […] The post Introducing shinyStan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

Rembrandt van Rijn (2) vs. Bertrand Russell

March 2, 2015
By
Rembrandt van Rijn (2) vs. Bertrand Russell

For yesterday, the most perceptive comment came from Slugger: Rabbit Angstrom is a perfect example of the life that the Buddha warns against. He is a creature of animal passions who never gains any enlightenment. In any case, I think we can all agree that Buddha is a far more interesting person than Updike. But, […] The post Rembrandt van Rijn (2) vs. Bertrand Russell appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

Reflecting on Alamar’s reflection on sports data

March 2, 2015
By

Ben Alamar reflects on the rise of data analytics in the NBA (link). I like this passage very much, which really nails home the point that good analytics requires intuition: The hours of waiting [during draft meetings] were often filled with watching film of prospects. It helped me refine my analysis, as I soaked up details from scouts that I never would have seen on my own. ("Rewind that. ...…

Read more »

The ET Interviews

March 2, 2015
By
The ET Interviews

Right from its inception in 1985, the journal Econometric Theory has featured the "ET Interviews". These are published interviews with key figures who have helped to shape the discipline of econometrics as we know it.Many of these interviews have ...

Read more »

At the APS Observer: a profile of JASP

March 2, 2015
By

The APS Observer has just published a profile of JASP, a graphical user interface designed to make statistics easier. It includes Bayesian procedures by means of the R and the BayesFactor package. From the article: JASP distinguishes itself from S...

Read more »

What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)

March 2, 2015
By
What hypothesis testing is all about.  (Hint:  It’s not what you think.)

I’ve said it before but it’s worth saying again. The conventional view: Hyp testing is all about rejection. The idea is that if you reject the null hyp at the 5% level, you have a win, you have learned that a certain null model is false and science has progressed, either in the glamorous “scientific […] The post What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)…

Read more »

Advanced Statistics for the Life Sciences MOOC Launches Today

March 2, 2015
By

In this four week course we will teach statistical techniques that are commonly used in the analysis of high-throughput data and their corresponding R implementations. In Week 1 we will explain inference in the context of high-throughput data and introduce the concept of error controlling procedures. We will describe the strengths and weakness of the Bonferroni correction,

Read more »

Statistical inference is only mostly wrong

March 2, 2015
By
Statistical inference is only mostly wrong

p-values banned!The journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology (BASP) made news recently by "banning" p-values.  Here's a summary of their major points:"...the null hypothesis significance testing procedure (NHSTP) is invalid...". &nbsp...

Read more »

On deck this week

March 2, 2015
By

Mon: What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.) Rembrandt van Rijn (2) vs. Betrand Russell Tues: One simple trick to make Stan run faster George Carlin (2) vs. Barbara Kruger Wed: I actually think this infographic is ok Bernard-Henry Levy (3) vs. Jacques Derrida Thurs: Defaults, once set, are hard […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Careers in Data Science and Business Analytics: a new course

March 2, 2015
By

Syllabus for one-day seminar on Big Data jobs and careers by Kaiser Fung

Read more »

Course Announcement: Data Visualization Workshop

March 2, 2015
By

The next installment of my data visualization workshop runs from April 7 to May 12 in New York City. My workshop is modeled after a creative writing workshop. The focus of the six weeks is on giving and receiving feedback...

Read more »

Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize!

March 2, 2015
By
Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize!

Last week I received a message from SAS Technical Support saying that a customer's IML program was running slowly. Could I look at it to see whether it could be improved? What I discovered is a good reminder about the importance of vectorizing user-defined modules. The program in this blog […] The post Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize! appeared first on The DO Loop.

Read more »

Modeling Earthquake Dynamics

March 2, 2015
By
Modeling Earthquake Dynamics

In 2012, with Marilou Durand, student at UQAM, we have been working on the seismic gap hypothesis, see e.g. McCann et al. (1978) or Kagan & Jackson (1991), or to be more specific, on the dynamics between earthquakes magnitude (or seismic moment) and inter-occurence durations. Our paper should appear soon in the Journal of Seismology, In this paper, we investigate questions arising in Parsons & Geist (2012). Pseudo causal models connecting magnitudes…

Read more »

To Beware or To Embrace The Prior

March 1, 2015
By
To Beware or To Embrace The Prior

In this guest post, Jeff Rouder reacts to two recent comments skeptical of Bayesian statistics, and describes the importance of the prior in Bayesian statistics. In short: the prior gives a Bayesian model the power to predict data, and prediction is what allows the evaluation of evidence. Far from being a liability, Bayesian priors are what make Bayesian statistics useful to science.Jeff Rouder writes:Bayes' Theorem is about 250 years old. For…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe