Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such thing as the plagiarism police.

September 23, 2016
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Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such thing as the plagiarism police.

The title of this post is a line that Thomas Basbøll wrote a couple years ago. Before I go on, let me say that the fact that I have not investigated this case in detail is not meant to imply that it’s not important or that it’s not worth investigating. It’s just not something that […] The post Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such…

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Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty

September 22, 2016
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Alexia Gaudeul writes: Maybe you will find this interesting / amusing / frightening, but the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty recently published a paper with a rather obvious multicollinearity problem. The issue does not come up that often in the published literature, so I thought you might find it interesting for your blog. The paper […] The post Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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an inverse permutation test

September 22, 2016
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an inverse permutation test

A straightforward but probabilistic riddle this week in the Riddler, which is to find the expected order of integer i when the sequence {1,2,…,n} is partitioned at random into two sets, A and B, each of which is then sorted before both sets are merged. For instance, if {1,2,3,4} is divided in A={1,4} and B={2,3}, […]

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Why is the scientific replication crisis centered on psychology?

September 22, 2016
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The replication crisis is a big deal. But it’s a problem in lots of scientific fields. Why is so much of the discussion about psychology research? Why not economics, which is more controversial and gets more space in the news media? Or medicine, which has higher stakes and a regular flow of well-publicized scandals? Here […] The post Why is the scientific replication crisis centered on psychology? appeared first on…

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Talk: Pie Charts – Unloved, Unstudied, and Misunderstood

September 22, 2016
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Talk: Pie Charts – Unloved, Unstudied, and Misunderstood

I gave a talk at Information+ earlier this year that has now been posted. It's about pie charts! And it was a fun talk, too. The video is focused a bit too much on me at the beginning, so you'll miss a few of the early jokes. But for the most part, you'll see the […]

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“Crimes Against Data”: My talk at Ohio State University this Thurs; “Solving Statistics Problems Using Stan”: My talk at the University of Michigan this Fri

September 21, 2016
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Crimes Against Data Statistics has been described as the science of uncertainty. But, paradoxically, statistical methods are often used to create a sense of certainty where none should exist. The social sciences have been rocked in recent years by highly publicized claims, published in top journals, that were reported as “statistically significant” but are implausible […] The post “Crimes Against Data”: My talk at Ohio State University this Thurs; “Solving…

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What has happened down here is the winds have changed

September 21, 2016
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What has happened down here is the winds have changed

Someone sent me this article by psychology professor Susan Fiske, scheduled to appear in the APS Observer, a magazine of the Association for Psychological Science. The article made me a little bit sad, and I was inclined to just keep my response short and sweet, but then it seemed worth the trouble to give some […] The post What has happened down here is the winds have changed appeared first…

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Simulate data from a generalized Gaussian distribution

September 21, 2016
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Simulate data from a generalized Gaussian distribution

Although statisticians often assume normally distributed errors, there are important processes for which the error distribution has a heavy tail. A well-known heavy-tailed distribution is the t distribution, but the t distribution is unsuitable for some applications because it does not have finite moments (means, variance,...) for small parameter values. […] The post Simulate data from a generalized Gaussian distribution appeared first on The DO Loop.

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A Fun Gastronomical Dataset: What’s on the Menu?

September 20, 2016
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A Fun Gastronomical Dataset: What’s on the Menu?

I just found a fun food themed dataset that I’d never heard about and that I thought I’d share. It’s from a project called What’s on the menu where the New York Public Library has crowdsourced a digitization of their collection of historical ...

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Uncertainty in a probability

September 20, 2016
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Uncertainty in a probability

Suppose you did a pilot study with 10 subjects and found a treatment was effective in 7 out of the 10 subjects. With no more information than this, what would you estimate the probability to be that the treatment is effective in the next subject? Easy: 0.7. Now what would you estimate the probability to be […]

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On "Shorter Papers"

September 20, 2016
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Journals should not corral shorter papers into sections like "Shorter Papers".  Doing so sends a subtle (actually unsubtle) message that shorter papers are basically second-class citizens, somehow less good, or less important, or less so...

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“Methodological terrorism”

September 20, 2016
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“Methodological terrorism”

Methodological terrorism is when you publish a paper in a peer-reviewed journal, its claim is supported by a statistically significant t statistic of 5.03, and someone looks at your numbers, figures out that the correct value is 1.8, and then posts that correction on social media. Terrorism is when somebody blows shit up and tries […] The post “Methodological terrorism” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Acupuncture paradox update

September 20, 2016
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The acupuncture paradox, as we discussed earlier, is: The scientific consensus appears to be that, to the extent that acupuncture makes people feel better, it is through relaxing the patient, also the acupuncturist might help in other ways, encouraging the patient to focus on his or her lifestyle. But whenever I discuss the topic with […] The post Acupuncture paradox update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Short Course on R and Data Mining, University of Canberra, Fri 7 Oct 2016

September 20, 2016
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Short Course on R and Data Mining Information Technology and Engineering, University of Canberra Fees: There is no fees for the short course but seats are limited to 60 – so register early through http://www.meetup.com/CanberraDataSci/events/234168862/ Presenters: Dr Yanchang Zhao (Adjunct … Continue reading →

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Tapestry 2017: St. Augustine, FL on March 1st

September 20, 2016
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Tapestry 2017: St. Augustine, FL on March 1st

We just announced next year's Tapestry Conference – the fifth episode (chapter? act?)! It will take place on March 1st, 2017, in St. Augustine, FL. We have three exciting keynotes, and we're looking for your talk proposals, posters, and demos! Tapestry is a conference about storytelling with data. The goal is to bring together people from different backgrounds and […]

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Relative error distributions, without the heavy tail theatrics

September 20, 2016
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Relative error distributions, without the heavy tail theatrics

Nina Zumel prepared an excellent article on the consequences of working with relative error distributed quantities (such as wealth, income, sales, and many more) called “Living in A Lognormal World.” The article emphasizes that if you are dealing with such quantities you are already seeing effects of relative error distributions (so it isn’t an exotic … Continue reading Relative error distributions, without the heavy tail theatrics

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StanCon is coming! Sat, 1/21/2017

September 19, 2016
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StanCon is coming! Sat, 1/21/2017

Save the date! The first Stan conference is going to be in NYC in January. Registration will open at the end of September.   When: Saturday, January 21, 2017 9 am – 5 pm   Where: Davis Auditorium, Columbia University 530 West 120th Street 4th floor (campus level), room 412 New York, NY 10027   […] The post StanCon is coming! Sat, 1/21/2017 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Primers in computational biology

September 19, 2016
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Primers in computational biology

I recently stumbled across this collection of computational biology primers in Nature Biotechnology. Many of these are old, but they're still great resources to get a fundamental understanding of the topic. Here they are in no particular order....How d...

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Primers in computational biology

September 19, 2016
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Primers in computational biology

I recently stumbled across this collection of computational biology primers in Nature Biotechnology. Many of these are old, but they're still great resources to get a fundamental understanding of the topic. Here they are in no particular order....How d...

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FDA approval of generic drugs: The untold story

September 19, 2016
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FDA approval of generic drugs:  The untold story

Someone writes in: I have MS and take a disease-modifying drug called Copaxone. Sandoz developed a generic version​ of Copaxone​ and filed for FDA approval. Teva, the manufacturer of Copaxone, filed a petition opposing that approval (surprise!). FDA rejected Teva’s petitions and approved the generic. Citizen_Petition_Denial_Letter_From_CDER_to_Teva_Pharmaceuticals My insurance company encouraged me to switch to the […] The post FDA approval of generic drugs: The untold story appeared first on Statistical…

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Depicting imbalance, straying from the standard chart

September 19, 2016
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Depicting imbalance, straying from the standard chart

My friend Tonny M. sent me a tip to two pretty nice charts depicting the state of U.S. healthcare spending (link). The first shows U.S. as an outlier: This chart is a replica of the Lane Kenworthy chart, with some...

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The distribution of nearest neighbor distances

September 19, 2016
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The distribution of nearest neighbor distances

Last week I showed how to compute nearest-neighbor distances for a set of numerical observations. Nearest-neighbor distances are used in many statistical computations, including the analysis of spatial point patterns. This article describes how the distribution of nearest-neighbor distances can help you determine whether spatial data are uniformly distributed or […] The post The distribution of nearest neighbor distances appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Mastering Software Development in R

September 19, 2016
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Today I’m happy to announce that we’re launching a new specialization on Coursera titled Mastering Software Development in R. This is a 5-course sequence developed with Sean Kross and Brooke Anderson. This sequence differs from our previous Data S...

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