Identifying the OS from R

June 10, 2015
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Sometimes a bit of R code needs to know what operating system it’s running on. Here’s a short account of where you can find this information and a little function to wrap the answer up neatly. Operating systems are a platform issue, so let’s start with the constants in the list .Platform. For Windows the […]

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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Captsone 2 Top Performers

June 10, 2015
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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Captsone 2 Top Performers

The second capstone session of the Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization concluded recently. This time, we had 1,040 learners sign up to participate in the session, which again featured a project developed in collaboration with the amazingly innovative folks at SwiftKey.  We've identified the learners listed below as the top performers in this capstone session.

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“Best Linear Unbiased Prediction” is exactly like the Holy Roman Empire

June 10, 2015
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Dan Gianola pointed me to this article, “One Hundred Years of Statistical Developments in Animal Breeding,” coauthored with Guilherme Rosa, which begins: Statistical methodology has played a key role in scientific animal breeding. Approximately one hundred years of statistical developments in animal breeding are reviewed. Some of the scientific foundations of the field are discussed, […] The post “Best Linear Unbiased Prediction” is exactly like the Holy Roman Empire appeared…

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Big Data and Chess: What are the Predictive Point Values of Chess Pieces?

June 10, 2015
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Big Data and Chess: What are the Predictive Point Values of Chess Pieces?

Who doesn’t like chess? Me! Sure, I like the idea of chess – intellectual masterminds battling each other using nothing but pure thought – the problem is that I tend to lose, probably because I don’t really know how to play well, and because ...

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Computing polar angles from coordinate data

June 10, 2015
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Computing polar angles from coordinate data

Equations that involve trigonometric functions can have infinitely many solutions. For example, the solution to the equation tan(θ)=1 is θ = π/4 + kπ, where k is any integer. In order to obtain a unique solution to the equation, we define the "arc" functions: inverse trigonometric functions that return a […] The post Computing polar angles from coordinate data appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Framework for statistical report-writing

June 10, 2015
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Framework for statistical report-writing

This framework helps teachers and students think about how to produce better statistical reports. Continue reading →

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Framework for statistical report-writing

June 10, 2015
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Framework for statistical report-writing

This framework helps teachers and students think about how to produce better statistical reports. Continue reading →

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Postdoc in psychometrics in Cardiff

June 10, 2015
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Richard Morey writes: I have a PhD position available at Cardiff University that I was hoping you might be able to publicise on your blog. It is for UK/EU students, and the project is negotiable but should be methods or statistical cognition. Here&#821...

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Worrying About my Cholesterol Level

June 10, 2015
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Worrying About my Cholesterol Level

The headline, "Don't Get Wrong Idea About Cholesterol", caught my attention in the 3 May, 2015 Times-Colonist newspaper here in Victoria, B.C.. In fact the article came from a syndicated column, published about a week earlier. No matter - it's always a...

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Estimating Analytics Software Market Share by Counting Books

June 9, 2015
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Below is the latest update to The Popularity of Data Analysis Software. Books The number of books published on each software package or language reflects its relative popularity. Amazon.com offers an advanced search method which works well for all the software except R … Continue reading →

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Batch effects are everywhere! Deflategate edition

June 9, 2015
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Batch effects are everywhere! Deflategate edition

In my opinion, batch effects are the biggest challenge faced by genomics research, especially in precision medicine. As we point out in this review, they are everywhere among high-throughput experiments. But batch effects are not specific to genomics technology. In fact, in this 1972 paper (paywalled), WJ Youden describes batch effects in the context of measurements made by physicists.

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The posterior distribution of the likelihood ratio as a summary of evidence

June 9, 2015
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Gabriel Marinello writes: I am a PhD student in Astrophysics and am writing this email to you because an enquiry about point null hypothesis testing (H0: Theta = Theta0 and H1: Theta != Theta0) in a bayesian context and I think that your pragmatic stance would be helpful. In Astrophysics is not rare to find […] The post The posterior distribution of the likelihood ratio as a summary of evidence…

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Mosquito, shoebox, and an ingenious apartment design

June 9, 2015
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Mosquito, shoebox, and an ingenious apartment design

First, I saw Alberto tweet his design for the Wall Street Journal (below is the English version): The yellow space is the size of the smallest "livable" apartment in Hong Kong, known as the "mosquito" apartment. Livability is defined by...

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Using system and web fonts in R plots

June 9, 2015
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Using system and web fonts in R plots

The forthcoming R Journal has an interesting article on the showtext package by Yixuan Qiu. The package allows me to use system and web fonts directly in R plots, reminding me a little of the approach taken by XeLaTeX. But "unlike other methods to embe...

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I’m a data scientist – mind if I do surgery on your heart?

June 8, 2015
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There has been a lot of recent interest from scientific journals and from other folks in creating checklists for data science and data analysis. The idea is that the checklist will help prevent results that won't reproduce or replicate from the literature. One analogy that I'm frequently hearing is the analogy with checklists for surgeons that can

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Summer dataviz workshop to start July 1

June 8, 2015
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Registration is open for my dataviz workshop at NYU. (link) This is a workshop in the sense of a creative writing workshop. Your "writing" are sketches of data visualization based on your selected datasets. In class, we critique all of...

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Survival of the fittest (health economic model)

June 8, 2015
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Survival of the fittest (health economic model)

To make up for the fact that we've missed a couple of slots over the past months in our seminar series, we thought we organised a more structured event. So, our next seminar will in fact be a workshop and will be held at UCL on 7 July from 1.30pm ...

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“The psychologists are getting a hard time for doing what they do, whereas people doing real harm to society are happily roaming around like free range chicken”

June 8, 2015
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“The psychologists are getting a hard time for doing what they do, whereas people doing real harm to society are happily roaming around like free range chicken”

Shravan Vasishth writes: At least people like Amy Cuddy are just doing bullshit research that’s harmless (after all, raising your arms up high before an interview is unlikely to hurt society much). But check out this MIT “Professor” explaining the “statistically significant” autism-vaccine “connection”: She even takes a notorious, fraudulent, and retracted Lancet article as […] The post “The psychologists are getting a hard time for doing what they do,…

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Video seminar

June 8, 2015
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Later this week, I'm off to Madrid to examine a PhD candidate at UNED (that's the Spanish Open University). This is interesting work on probabilistic network for health economic evaluation, so it should be good.As part of my trip, I'll also give a...

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On deck this week

June 8, 2015
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Mon: “The psychologists are getting a hard time for doing what they do, whereas people doing real harm to society are happily roaming around like free range chicken” Tues: The posterior distribution of the likelihood ratio as a summary of evidence Wed: “Best Linear Unbiased Prediction” is exactly like the Holy Roman Empire Thurs: Applied […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Fit a circle to data

June 8, 2015
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Fit a circle to data

I still remember the first time I was asked to "consult" on a statistical problem. A former physics professor had some students who had gathered data that should lie along an arc of a theoretical circle. The professor asked if there was a regression technique that could find the center […] The post Fit a circle to data appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Econometric Seasonality Research is Back

June 7, 2015
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Seasonality research is back! Well, at least a bit.I recall heady earlier days, with classic work like Granger's typical spectral shape, mutiplicative seasonal Box-Jenkins and the airline model, Nerlove's unobserved-components models and Harvey's basic...

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What to do to train to apply statistical models to political science and public policy issues

June 7, 2015
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Taylor Good writes: I am a graduate of a state school with a BS in Math and a BA in Political Science, and I was wondering if you could give me some career advice. Knowing how you got to where you are now, what path would you advise someone to take to get to where […] The post What to do to train to apply statistical models to political science…

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