Why shouldn’t I dichotomize my outcome variable?

January 13, 2014
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My collaborators periodically want to dichotimize a continuous outcome such as a depression scale into a binary depressed/not depressed variable. Another popular one is Body Mass Index (BMI) gets classified into obese/not obese. Every time this arises...

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Job @ UCD

January 13, 2014
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This is an interesting job opportunity $-$ Mark (this is his UCL webpage, although he's now officially transitioned to Warwick) has pointed this out to me, and I thought I may as well advertise it through the blog!

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How to Find a Job in Statistics – Advice for Students and Recent Graduates

How to Find a Job in Statistics – Advice for Students and Recent Graduates

Introduction A graduate student in statistics recently asked me for advice on how to find a job in our industry.  I’m happy to share my advice about this, and I hope that my advice can help you to find a satisfying job and develop an enjoyable career.  My perspectives would be most useful to students […]

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Postdoc with Liz Stuart on propensity score methods when the covariates are measured with error

January 13, 2014
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Liz Stuart sends this one along: Johns Hopkins University Post-Doctoral Fellow Opening The Department of Mental Health invites applications for a post-doctoral research fellow in Statistical Methods for Mental Health Research, to be supervised by Dr. Elizabeth Stuart. The successful applicant for this position will work on an NIH funded study to develop and evaluate […]The post Postdoc with Liz Stuart on propensity score methods when the covariates are measured…

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How To Install BioPerl Without Root Privileges

January 13, 2014
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How To Install BioPerl Without Root Privileges

I've seen this question asked and partially answered all around the web. As with anything related to Perl, I'm sure there is more than one way to do it. Here's how I do it with Perl 5.10.1 on CentOS 6.4.First, install local::lib with bootstra...

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Judea Pearl overview on causal inference, and more general thoughts on the reexpression of existing methods by considering their implicit assumptions

January 13, 2014
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This material should be familiar to many of you but could be helpful to newcomers. Pearl writes: ALL causal conclusions in nonexperimental settings must be based on untested, judgmental assumptions that investigators are prepared to defend on scientific grounds. . . . To understand what the world should be like for a given procedure to […]The post Judea Pearl overview on causal inference, and more general thoughts on the reexpression…

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Announcement: Dataviz Workshop for Spring 2014

January 13, 2014
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I'm very excited to preview the syllabus of a new dataviz course I've been developing to be launched in Spring 2014. This course is focused on the craft of graph building, and is modeled after the writing workshop. Students will...

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garch models caught in the spotlight

January 13, 2014
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An attempt to clarify the basics. Previously There have been several posts about garch.  In particular: A practical introduction to garch modeling The components garch model in the rugarch package Genesis A reader emailed me because he was confused about the workings of garch in general, and simulation with the empirical distribution in particular. If … Continue reading →

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How to vectorize time series computations

January 13, 2014
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How to vectorize time series computations

Vector languages such as SAS/IML, MATLAB, and R are powerful because they enable you to use high-level matrix operations (matrix multiplication, dot products, etc) rather than loops that perform scalar operations. In general, vectorized programs are more efficient (and therefore run faster) than programs that contain loops. For an example [...]

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/12/2014)

January 13, 2014
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Well it technically is Monday, but I never went to sleep so that still counts as Sunday right? As a person who has taught a couple of MOOCs I'm used to getting some pushback from people who don't like the … Continue reading →

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The State of Information Visualization, 2014

January 13, 2014
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The State of Information Visualization, 2014

2013 was another exciting year for visualization. Between many new developments in data storytelling, a new wave of news graphics, new visualization blogs, better automated infographics, and visuals designed to hit you hard, it is difficult to decide what was most important. Here is a look back, and some ideas about where we’re going. Storytelling […]

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MCMSki IV [mistakes and regrets]

January 12, 2014
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MCMSki IV [mistakes and regrets]

Now that the conference and the Bayesian non-parametric satellite workshop (thanks to Judith!) are over, with (almost) everyone back home, and that the post-partum conference blues settles in (!), I can reflect on how things ran for those meetings and what I could have done to improve them… (Not yet considering to propose a second […]

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Things that I like that almost nobody else is interested in

January 12, 2014
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This post by Jordan Ellenberg (“Stoner represents a certain strain in the mid-century American novel that I really like, and which I don’t think exists in contemporary fiction. Anguish, verbal restraint, weirdness”) reminds me that what I really like is mid-to-late-twentieth-century literary criticism. I read a great book from the 50s, I think it was, […]The post Things that I like that almost nobody else is interested in appeared first…

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The Extra Step: Graphs for Communication versus Exploration

January 12, 2014
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The Extra Step: Graphs for Communication versus Exploration

Visualization is a useful tool for data exploration and statistical analysis, and it’s an important method for communicating your discoveries to others. While those two uses of visualization are related, they aren’t identical. One of the reasons that I like ggplot so much is that it excels at layering together multiple views and summaries of […] Related posts: Revisiting Cleveland’s The Elements of Graphing Data in ggplot2 My Favorite Graphs…

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“At the risk of deviating from the standards of close reading, this requires some context”

January 12, 2014
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Mark Palko waxes indignant about corporate postmodernism. The post “At the risk of deviating from the standards of close reading, this requires some context” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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English Professor Suddenly Realizes Students Will Believe Literally Anything She Says

January 12, 2014
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An Onion, via Shayna Connelly  http://www.theonion.com/articles/english-professor-suddenly-realizes-students-will,34911/ Being a teacher is an awesome responsibility. Use it wisely.  Remember: Only you can prevent forest fires. The rest of us just ...

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Guest Post: The Importance of Keeping Your CV/Resume Current

January 12, 2014
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Guest post by Robin Jeffries, copied from the niece* blog NorCalBiostat. My graduate advisor was adamant about me keeping my CV current. Every little consulting project, every award, presentation or co-authorship on a paper had to be on there. When I ...

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Converting a JAGS model to STAN

January 11, 2014
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For my first experience with STAN I wanted to convert my last JAGS program into STAN. This was a bit more difficult than I expected. The JAGS program was Fe concentration in rainwater including values below detection level.DataData has been explained b...

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Statistical Interests in Large Cities

January 11, 2014
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Statistical Interests in Large Cities

I always thought that there were some kind of schools in statistics, areas (not to say universities or laboratories) where people had common interest in term of statistical methodology. Like people with strong interest in extreme values, or in Lévy Processes. I wanted to check this point so I did extract information about articles puslished in about 35 journals in statistics, probability and econometrics. I got all the information in…

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Bias and MLE

January 11, 2014
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Bias and MLE

Before leaving the office, this evening, JP decided to knock at my door to ask me a “quick and very basic question” (as he put it). This is JP’s stategy, and he knows it works. His question was – more or less – what do we know about the bias in maximum likelihood estimation when we have a small sample, from a Gamma distribution. He was surprised by some results…

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3 years out of date on the whole Dennis the dentist thing!

January 10, 2014
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3 years out of date on the whole Dennis the dentist thing!

Paging Uri Simonsohn . . . January 2014: Alice Robb writes, completely uncritically: “If Your Name is Dennis, You’re More Likely to Become a Dentist The strange science of how names shape careers.” But look what you can learn from a quick google: Hmmmm, maybe worth following up on that second link . . . […]The post 3 years out of date on the whole Dennis the dentist thing! appeared…

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Porn capital of the porn nation

January 10, 2014
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Porn capital of the porn nation

The other day I was having a quick look at the newspapers and I stumbled on this article. Apparently, Pornhub (a website whose mission should be pretty clear) have analysed the data on their customers and found out that the town of Ware (Hertfords...

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Finding the R community a barrier to entry, Python looks elsewhere for lunch

January 10, 2014
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Tal Yarkoni's post on "The homogenization of scientific computing, or why Python is steadily eating other languages' lunch" is an enjoyable read of his transition from R to Python. He makes a good case, and I have no argument with his reasoning or the ...

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