Sorry, but I’m with Richard Ford on this one

February 8, 2015
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I just read the new Colson Whitehead book, the one where he plays poker? I like it at first, he had some great bits, but then it got boring. And, really, is there any gimmick less appealing, at this point, than “author/journalist goes and tries his luck at the World Series of Poker”? I don’t […] The post Sorry, but I’m with Richard Ford on this one appeared first on…

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UIUC free online courses on data mining starting on 9 Feb, lectured by Prof. Jiawei Han et al.

February 8, 2015
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UIUC free online courses on data mining starting on 9 Feb, lectured by Prof. Jiawei Han et al.

by Yanchang Zhao, RDataMining.com A series of free online data mining courses will start on 9 Feb 2015, lectured by Prof. Jiawei Han and several other staff at UIUC. Prof. Han is one of the top data mining researchers around … Continue reading →

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Hierarchical log odds model example

February 8, 2015
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Hierarchical log odds model example

I am working through Bayesian Approaches to Clinical Trials and Health-Care Evaluation (David J. Spiegelhalter, Keith R. Abrams, Jonathan P. Myles) (referred to as BACTHCE from here on). In chapter three I saw an example (3.13) where I wanted to d...

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Miguel de Cervantes (2) vs. Joan Crawford

February 7, 2015
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Miguel de Cervantes (2) vs. Joan Crawford

The winner from yesterday is Mohammad. The strongest case for Ed McMahon came from Chris in comments: “Taking the guest out for drinks after the seminar would also be easier for McMahon than Mohammed.” And that’s not a bad argument. But as Nick put it, if there’s a translator (which I’m assuming there is), McMahon […] The post Miguel de Cervantes (2) vs. Joan Crawford appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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More 3D Graphics (rgl) for Classification with Local Logistic Regression and Kernel Density Estimates (from The Elements of Statistical Learning)

February 7, 2015
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More 3D Graphics (rgl) for Classification with Local Logistic Regression and Kernel Density Estimates (from The Elements of Statistical Learning)

This post builds on a previous post, but can be read and understood independently. As part of my course on statistical learning, we created 3D graphics to foster a more intuitive understanding of the various methods that are used to relax the assumption of linearity (in the predictors) in regression and classification methods. The authors … Continue reading More 3D Graphics (rgl) for Classification with Local Logistic Regression and Kernel…

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How a clever analysis of health survey data became transformed into bogus feel-good medical advice

February 7, 2015
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Jonathan Falk sends a message with the heading, “Garden of forking paths, p value abuse, questionable causality, you name it,” this link to an article in JAMA Internal Medicine, and the following remarks: Unfortunately, I can only see the first page of this article, but it seems to contain all the usual suspects. (a) Forking […] The post How a clever analysis of health survey data became transformed into bogus…

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On making a Bayesian omelet

February 7, 2015
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My colleagues Eric-Jan Wagenmakers and Jeff Rouder and I have a new manuscript in which we respond to Hoijtink, van Kooten, and Hulsker's in press manuscript Why Bayesian Psychologists Should Change the Way they Use the Bayes Factor. They sug...

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Calculating the likelihood of item overlap with Base R Assessment

February 6, 2015
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Calculating the likelihood of item overlap with Base R Assessment

I have recently received an email from someone who had taken my Base R Assessment. In this email, the test taker reported that a large portion of the test items taken were duplicates (around 50%) when he took the test the second time.I began wondering ...

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Mohammad (2) vs. Ed McMahon

February 6, 2015
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Mohammad (2) vs. Ed McMahon

For yesterday’s contest, I gotta go with Mary Baker Eddy. James Joyce got off some memorable lines in his time but Eddy seems like she’d be a better speaker, especially if we could turn the conversation toward evidence-based medicine. And now we have a battle between two great communicators. It’s too bad these guys have […] The post Mohammad (2) vs. Ed McMahon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Statistical analysis recapitulates the development of statistical methods

February 6, 2015
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Statistical analysis recapitulates the development of statistical methods

There’s a old saying in biology that the development of the organism recapitulates the development of the species: thus in utero each of us starts as a single-celled creature and then develops into an embryo that successively looks like a simple organism, then like a fish, an amphibian, etc., until we reach our human form […] The post Statistical analysis recapitulates the development of statistical methods appeared first on Statistical…

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Stephen Senn: Is Pooling Fooling? (Guest Post)

February 6, 2015
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Stephen Senn: Is Pooling Fooling? (Guest Post)

Stephen Senn Head, Methodology and Statistics Group, Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS), Luxembourg Is Pooling Fooling? ‘And take the case of a man who is ill. I call two physicians: they differ in opinion. I am not to lie down, and die between them: I must do something.’ Samuel Johnson, in Boswell’s A Journal […]

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Godless freshmen: now more Nones than Catholics

February 5, 2015
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Godless freshmen: now more Nones than Catholics

This article is an update to my annual series on one of the most under-reported stories of the decade: the fraction of college freshmen who report no religious preference has more than tripled since 1985, from 8% to 27%, and the trend is accelerating.I...

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Migrating code pieces to GitHub

February 5, 2015
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Migrating code pieces to GitHub

One of the original reasons for this blog was to keep track of my SAS code as well as its relevant context. That was the mindset when I was a SAS analyst, but now working in professional software company, using the right tool for versioning, col...

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James Joyce (3) vs. Mary Baker Eddy

February 5, 2015
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James Joyce (3) vs. Mary Baker Eddy

Yesterday’s winner will come as no surprise to you. My favorite argument in favor of L. Ron Hubbard came from Jameson: “We know that Hubbard has what it takes in terms of cheating things. Specifically, he’d be willing to sell his own religion down the river (ahem) for an extra hour of life. Thus, we […] The post James Joyce (3) vs. Mary Baker Eddy appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Top Performers

February 5, 2015
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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Top Performers

Editor's note: The Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization is the largest data science program in the world.  Brian, Roger, and myself  conceived the program at the beginning of January 2014 , then built, recorded, and launched the classes starting in April 2014 with the help of Ira.  Since April 2014 we have enrolled 1.76 million student and

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Early data on knowledge units – atoms of statistical education

February 5, 2015
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Early data on knowledge units – atoms of statistical education

Yesterday I posted about atomizing statistical education into knowledge units. You can try out the first knowledge unit here: https://jtleek.typeform.com/to/jMPZQe. The early data is in and it is consistent with many of our hypotheses about the future of online education. Namely: Completion rates are high when segments are shorter You can learn something about statistics in

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Why I keep talking about “generalizing from sample to population”

February 5, 2015
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Someone publishes some claim, some statistical comparison with “p less than .05″ attached to it. My response is: OK, you see this pattern in the sample. Do you think it holds in the population? Why do I ask this? Why don’t I ask the more standard question: Do you really think this result is statistically […] The post Why I keep talking about “generalizing from sample to population” appeared first…

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There are no easy charts

February 5, 2015
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There are no easy charts

Every chart, even if the dataset is small, deserves care. Long-time reader zbicyclist submits the following, which illustrates this point well. The following comments are by zbicyclist: This is from http://win.niddk.nih.gov/statistics/ -- from the National Institute of Diabetes and Kidney...

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Free online data mining and machine learning courses by Stanford University

February 5, 2015
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Free online data mining and machine learning courses by Stanford University

by Yanchang Zhao, RDataMining.com Three free online data mining and machine learning courses lectured by professors at Stanford University started in past two weeks, which provide excellent opportunities to learn advanced data mining and machine learning techniques. If you are … Continue reading →

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Four Different Types of Regression Residuals

February 4, 2015
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Four Different Types of Regression Residuals

When we estimate a regression model, the differences between the actual and "predicted" values for the dependent variable (over the sample) are termed the "residuals". Specifically, if the model is of the form:            ...

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Four Different Types of Regression Residuals

February 4, 2015
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Four Different Types of Regression Residuals

When we estimate a regression model, the differences between the actual and "predicted" values for the dependent variable (over the sample) are termed the "residuals". Specifically, if the model is of the form:            ...

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Knowledge units – the atoms of statistical education

February 4, 2015
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Editor's note: This idea is Brian's idea and based on conversations with him and Roger, but I just executed it. The length of academic courses has traditionally ranged between a few days for a short course to a few months for a semester-long course.  Lectures are typically either 30 minutes or one hour. Term and lecture lengths

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Microbial Genomics: the State of the Art in 2015

February 4, 2015
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Microbial Genomics: the State of the Art in 2015

Current Opinion in Microbiology recently published a special issue in genomics. In an excellent editorial overview, “Genomics: The era of genomically-enabled microbiology”, Neil Hall and Jay Hinton give an overview of the state of the field in micr...

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