Data are from the Past

February 26, 2015
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Data are from the Past

There’s a lot of discussion and also big hope about what is called Big Data and the role of Data …Continue reading →

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Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper

February 26, 2015
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Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper

The top-seeded comedian vs. an unseeded philosopher. Pryor would be much more entertaining, that’s for sure (“Arizona State Penitentiary population: 80 percent black people. But there are no black people in Arizona!”). But Karl Popper laid out the philosophy that is the foundation for modern science. His talk, even if it is dry, might ultimately […] The post Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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R: How to Layout and Design an Infographic

February 26, 2015
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R: How to Layout and Design an Infographic

As promised from my recent article, here's my tutorial on how to layout and design an infographic in R. This article will serve as a template for more infographic design that I plan to share on future posts. Hence, we will go through the following sect...

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Psych journal bans significance tests; stat blogger inundated with emails

February 26, 2015
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OK, it’s been a busy email day. From Brandon Nakawaki: I know your blog is perpetually backlogged by a few months, but I thought I’d forward this to you in case it hadn’t hit your inbox yet. A journal called Basic and Applied Social Psychology is banning null hypothesis significance testing in favor of descriptive […] The post Psych journal bans significance tests; stat blogger inundated with emails appeared first…

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"Is the call to abandon p-values the red herring of the replicability crisis?"

February 26, 2015
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"Is the call to abandon p-values the red herring of the replicability crisis?"

In an opinion article [here] titled "Is the call to abandon p-values the red herring of the replicability crisis?", Victoria Savalei and Elizabeth Dunn concluded, "at present we lack empirical evidence that encouraging researchers to abandon p-values ...

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Announcing: Introduction to Data Science video course

February 25, 2015
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Announcing: Introduction to Data Science video course

Win-Vector LLC’s Nina Zumel and John Mount are proud to announce their new data science video course Introduction to Data Science is now available on Udemy. We designed the course as an introduction to an advanced topic. The course description is: Use the R Programming Language to execute data science projects and become a data … Continue reading Announcing: Introduction to Data Science video course → Related posts: A bit…

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3 YEARS AGO: (FEBRUARY 2012) MEMORY LANE

February 25, 2015
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3 YEARS AGO: (FEBRUARY 2012) MEMORY LANE

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: February 2012. I am to mark in red three posts (or units) that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog. Given our Fisher reblogs, we’ve already seen many this month. So, I’m marking in red (1) The Triad, and (2) the Unit on Spanos’ misspecification tests. Plase see those posts for […]

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Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen

February 25, 2015
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Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen

Yesterday’s is a super-tough call. I’d much rather hear Stewart Lee than Aristotle. I read one of Lee’s books, and he’s a fascinating explicator of performance. Lee gives off a charming David Owen vibe—Phil, you know what I’m saying here—he’s an everyman, nothing special, he’s just been thinking really hard lately and wants to share […] The post Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Link: The Graphic Continuum

February 25, 2015
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The Graphic Continuum is a poster created by Jon Schwabish and Severino Ribecca (the man behind the Data Visualisation Catalogue). It lists almost 90 different chart types and organizes them into five large groups: distribution, time, comparing categories, geospatial, part-to-whole, and relationships. Some of them are connected across groups where there are further similarities. The poster is printed very nicely and … Continue reading Link: The Graphic Continuum

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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

February 25, 2015
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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

John Sukup writes: I came across a chart recently posted by Boston Consulting Group on LinkedIn and wondered what your take on it was. To me, it seems to fall into the “suspicious” category but thought you may have a different opinion. I replied that this one baffles me cos I don’t know what the […] The post The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.…

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Composite ranking and numbersense

February 25, 2015
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Composite ranking and numbersense

Chapter 1 of Numbersense (link)uses the example of U.S. News ranking of law schools to explore the national pastime of ranking almost anything. Since there is no objective standard for the "correct" ranking, it is pointless to complain about "arbitrary" weighting and so on. Every replacement has its own assumptions. A more productive path forward is to understand how the composite ranking is created, and shine a light on the…

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Plotting multiple series: Transforming data from wide to long

February 25, 2015
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Plotting multiple series: Transforming data from wide to long

Data. To a statistician, data are the observed values. To a SAS programmer, analyzing data requires knowledge of the values and how the data are arranged in a data set. Sometimes the data are in a "wide form" in which there are many variables. However, to perform a certain analysis […]

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Upcoming talk on survival analysis in Python

February 24, 2015
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Upcoming talk on survival analysis in Python

On March 2, 2015 I am presenting a short talk for the Python Data Science meetup.  Here is the announcement for the meetup.And here are my slides:The code for the talk is in an IPython notebook you can view on nbviewer.  It is still a work in...

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Visualizing Clusters

February 24, 2015
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Visualizing Clusters

Consider the following dataset, with (only) ten points x=c(.4,.55,.65,.9,.1,.35,.5,.15,.2,.85) y=c(.85,.95,.8,.87,.5,.55,.5,.2,.1,.3) plot(x,y,pch=19,cex=2) We want to get – say – two clusters. Or more specifically, two sets of observations, each of them sharing some similarities. Since the number of observations is rather small, it is actually possible to get an exhaustive list of all partitions, and to minimize some criteria, such as the within variance. Given a vector with clusters, we compute…

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Finding the best dose

February 24, 2015
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Finding the best dose

In a dose-finding clinical trial, you have a small number of doses to test, and you hope find the one with the best response. Here “best” may mean most effective, least toxic, closest to a target toxicity, some combination of criteria, etc. Since your goal is to find the best dose, it seems natural to compare dose-finding […]

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Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee

February 24, 2015
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Yesterday‘s winner is a tough one. Really, these two guys could’ve met in the final. Some arguments in the comments in favor of Freud: From Huw, “he has the smirks, knowing looks, and barely missed sidelong glances.” And Seth points out the statistical connection: “Some people might say that theory is getting lost in the […] The post Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Upcoming Stan-related talks

February 24, 2015
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If you’re in NYC or Sidney, there are some Stan-related talks in the next few weeks.   New York 25 February. Jonah Gabry: shinyStan: a graphical user interface for exploring Bayesian models after MCMC. Register Now: New York Open Statistical Programming Meetup. 12 March. Rob Trangucci: #5: Non-centered parameterization aka the “Matt trick.” Register Now: Stan […] The post Upcoming Stan-related talks appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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“A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh?

February 24, 2015
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Lee Beck writes: I’m curious if you have any thoughts on the statistical meaning of sentences like “a small but growing collection of studies suggest [X].” That exact wording comes from this piece in the New Yorker, but I think it’s the sort of expression you often see in science journalism (“small but mounting”, “small […] The post “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . .…

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A startling chart about income inequality, with interpretative difficulties

February 24, 2015
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A startling chart about income inequality, with interpretative difficulties

Reader Robbi B. submitted the following chart posted to Twitter by Branko Milanovic: The chart took a little time to figure out. This isn't a bad chart. Robbi wondered if there are alternative ways to plot this information. The U.S....

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Minimal examples help

February 24, 2015
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Minimal examples help

The other day I got stuck working with a huge data set using data.table in R. It took me a little while to realise that I had to produce a minimal reproducible example to actually understand why I got stuck in the first place. I know, this is the mantr...

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Journal bans null hypothesis significance tests

February 24, 2015
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Journal bans null hypothesis significance tests

In a recent editorial [here], the journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology has banned the null hypothesis significance testing procedure (NHSTP). "We hope and anticipate that banning the NHSTP will have the effect of increasing the quality of submit...

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Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud

February 23, 2015
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Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud

We didn’t get any great comments yesterday, so I’ll have to go with PKD on the grounds that he was the presumptive favorite, and nobody made any good case otherwise. And today we have the second seed among the Religious Leaders vs. an unseeded entry in the Founders of Religions category. Truly a classic matchup. […] The post Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department]

February 23, 2015
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“Unbiasedness”:  You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department]

The talk is tomorrow, Tues 24 Feb, 2:40-4:00pm in 200 Fisher Hall: “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Minimizing bias is the traditional first goal of econometrics. In many cases, though, the […] The post “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means…

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