Reproducibility is hard

September 9, 2015
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Reproducibility is hard

Reproducibility is hard. It will probably always be hard, because it’s hard keeping things organized. I recently had a paper accepted at G3, concerning a huge set of sample mix-ups in a large eQTL study. I’d discovered and worked out the issue back in December, 2010. I gave a talk about it at the Mouse […]

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Home alone

September 9, 2015
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Home alone

As Marta is heading to a conference, XY and I will spend a couple of days at home alone. Hopefully that won't end up like in the picture here...

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Irwin Shaw: “I might mistrust intellectuals, but I’d mistrust nonintellectuals even more.”

September 9, 2015
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Irwin Shaw:  “I might mistrust intellectuals, but I’d mistrust nonintellectuals even more.”

A few weeks ago I picked up a paperback of stories by Irwin Shaw, printed in the late 1950s. I love these little pocket books—but this one was a bit too disposable: after about 50 pages the spine gave out and the pages started to fall out, which was a bit irritating because then I […] The post Irwin Shaw: “I might mistrust intellectuals, but I’d mistrust nonintellectuals even more.”…

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Rethinking the index data, with modesty and clarity in mind

September 9, 2015
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Rethinking the index data, with modesty and clarity in mind

I discussed the rose chart used in the Environmental Performance Index (EPI) report last week. This type of data is always challenging to visualize. One should start with an objective. If the goal is a data dump, that is to...

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No one in Gene Woolsey’s class made spelling errors

September 9, 2015
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I wished I had a chance to take Gene Woolsey's class. Woolsey was a major personality in Operations Research, and from reading a set of remembrances in ORMS Today (June 2015), I learned that he was also an amazing teacher. And no one in his class made spelling errors! How cool is that. Well, I don't know if no one ever made a spelling error but I bet that the…

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debunking a (minor and personal) myth

September 9, 2015
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debunking a (minor and personal) myth

For quite a while, I entertained the idea that Beta and Dirichlet proposals  were more adequate than (log-)normal random walks proposals for parameters on (0,1) and simplicia (simplices, simplexes), respectively, when running an MCMC. For instance, for p in (0,1) the value of the Markov chain at time t-1, the proposal at time t could […]

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debunking a (minor and personal) myth

September 9, 2015
By
debunking a (minor and personal) myth

For quite a while, I entertained the idea that Beta and Dirichlet proposals  were more adequate than (log-)normal random walks proposals for parameters on (0,1) and simplicia (simplices, simplexes), respectively, when running an MCMC. For instance, for p in (0,1) the value of the Markov chain at time t-1, the proposal at time t could […]

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Recipe for Centered Horizontal Stacked Barplots (Useful for Likert scale responses)

September 8, 2015
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Recipe for Centered Horizontal Stacked Barplots (Useful for Likert scale responses)

There is a nice package and paper about this here: http://www.jstatsoft.org/v57/i05/paper. However, the associated code is complex and uses lattice. Here's a brief recipe using base graphics that implements the above figure: set.seed(40) x

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Statbusters: Were you drunk on Labor Day?

September 8, 2015
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On Labor Day, our new Statbusters column appeared. This one concerns a popular news story from some weeks ago, saying science has proven that there are four types of drunks. The four refers to four "clusters" formed by running a cluster analysis algorithm. But four is decided by the analyst. Some algorithms won't run unless the analyst specifies the number of clusters; other algorithms generate the best structure for every…

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“Dow 36,000” guy offers an opinion on Tom Brady’s balls. The rest of us are supposed to listen?

September 8, 2015
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Football season is returning so it’s time for us to return to that favorite statistical topic from the past football season: Tom Brady’s deflated balls. Back in June, Jonathan Falk pointed me to this report. You can click through if you’d like and take a look. I didn’t bother reading it because it had no […] The post “Dow 36,000” guy offers an opinion on Tom Brady’s balls. The rest…

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Find the ODS table names produced by any SAS procedure

September 8, 2015
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Find the ODS table names produced by any SAS procedure

Statistical programmers often have to use the results from one SAS procedure as the input to another SAS procedure. Because ODS enables you to you to create a SAS data set from any ODS table or graph, it is easy to obtain a data set that contains the value of […] The post Find the ODS table names produced by any SAS procedure appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Matlab/Octave and Python demos for BDA3

September 7, 2015
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My Bayesian Data Analysis course at Aalto University started today with a record number of 84 registered students! In my course I have used some Matlab/Octave demos for several years. This summer Tuomas Sivula translated most of them to Python and Python notebook. Both Matlab/Octave and Python demos are now available at Github in hope they […] The post Matlab/Octave and Python demos for BDA3 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 2: In-training set measures

September 7, 2015
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How do you know if your model is going to work? Part 2: In-training set measures

Authors: John Mount (more articles) and Nina Zumel (more articles). When fitting and selecting models in a data science project, how do you know that your final model is good? And how sure are you that it’s better than the models that you rejected? In this Part 2 of our four part mini-series “How do … Continue reading How do you know if your model is going to work? Part…

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BEA to Resume Provision of NSA GDP

September 7, 2015
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In an earlier post, I argued for publication of non-seasonally-adjusted (NSA) series. Thanks to a helpful communication from Jonathan Wright, I recently learned (as did he) that BEA will resume compilation and publication of NSA U.S. GDP...

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College redux

September 7, 2015
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College redux

What's all this talk about Bayesian Inference the kids are spreading on Snapchat? You too can get in on the conversation. Learning modern statistics made fun and easy! Brought to you by Dataman. 

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Comments on Imbens and Rubin causal inference book

September 7, 2015
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Guido Imbens and Don Rubin recently came out with a book on causal inference. The book’s great (of course I would say that, as I’ve collaborated with both authors) and it’s so popular that I keep having to get new copies because people keep borrowing my copy and not returning it. Imbens and Rubin come […] The post Comments on Imbens and Rubin causal inference book appeared first on Statistical…

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On deck this week

September 7, 2015
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Mon: Comments on Imbens and Rubin causal inference book Tues: “Dow 36,000″ guy offers an opinion on Tom Brady’s balls. The rest of us are supposed to listen? Wed: Irwin Shaw: “I might mistrust intellectuals, but I’d mistrust nonintellectuals even more.” Thurs: Death of a statistician Fri: Being polite vs. saying what we really think […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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About replication bullies and scientific progress …

September 7, 2015
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These days psychology really is exciting, and I do not mean the Frster case … In May 2014 a special issue full of replication attempts has been released – all open access, all raw data released! This is great work, powered by the open scien...

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In the era of #repligate: What are valid cues for the trustworthiness of a study?

September 7, 2015
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[Update 2015/1/14: I consolidate feedback from Twitter, comments, email, and real life into the main text (StackExchange-style), so that we get a good and improving answer. Thanks to @TonyLFreitas,@PhDefunct, @bahniks, @JoeHilgard, @_r_c_a, @richardmor...

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Gaze-cueing and trustworthiness: New paper + raw data + R script on OSF

September 7, 2015
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Recently, a student of mine (Felix Senbach, now at the University of Edinburgh) and I published a little study on gaze-cueing, and how it is moderated by the trustworthiness of the gazing person. In a nutshell, although instructed to ignore the gaze, p...

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#HIBAR: Why Using Age as a Proxy for Testosterone is a Bad Deal.

September 7, 2015
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This is a post-publication peer review (HIBAR: “Had I Been A Reviewer”) of the following paper: Levi, M., Li, K., & Zhang, F. (2010). Deal or no deal: Hormones and the mergers and acquisitions game. Management Science 56, 1462 -1483. A ...

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More Stan on the blog

September 7, 2015
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Whoa. Stan is 3 years old. We’ve come a long way since the start. I came into the project just as a working prototype was implemented by Matt and Bob with discussions with Andrew, Ben, Michael Malecki, Jiqiang, and others. (I had been working for Andrew prior to the official start of the project, but […] The post More Stan on the blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Guns and Rare Events

September 6, 2015
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Seems that people with severe mental illness are able to easily purchase guns in this country. Seems like people (whether actually mentally ill or not) who are upset and angry and want to hurt someone also can purchase a gun easily. Often we hear that...

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