Priorities

May 10, 2014
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Priorities

I like the way Channel 4 news prioritise their stories (that's their homepage as of 12.06PM $-$ below the one about Mrs President Obama, but above the one about Mr President Putin...

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Enrollments in US in Different Languages using rCharts and ggplot2

May 9, 2014
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UPDATE: THE BLOG/SITE HAS MOVED TO GITHUB. THE NEW LINK FOR THE BLOG/SITE IS patilv.github.io and THE LINK TO THIS POST IS: http://bit.ly/1pi5z8l . PLEASE UPDATE ANY BOOKMARKS YOU MAY HAVE.

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Replication in Economics

May 9, 2014
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Replication in Economics

I was pleased to receive an email today, alerting me to the "Replication in Economics" wiki at the University of Göttingen:"My name is Jan H. Höffler, I have been working on a replication project funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking duri...

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Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty: Structural Equation Model or One-Dimensional Dissonance

May 9, 2014
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Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty: Structural Equation Model or One-Dimensional Dissonance

Causal thinking is seductive. Product experience comes first, then feelings of satisfaction, and finally intentions to continue as a customer. Although customer satisfaction and loyalty data tend to be collected all at one time within the same question...

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More on the History of Econometrics

May 9, 2014
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More on the History of Econometrics

Olav Bjerkholt, of the University of Oslo, emailed me to follow up on my May Reading List post. He commented:"I noted that you have posted a paper by me on your May list. I recently posted it as a SSRN paper with two others which also might i...

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Further points on crayon colors

May 9, 2014
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Further points on crayon colors

I saw this great post on crayola crayon colors at the Learning R blog, reproducing a nice graph of the Crayola crayon colors over time. (Also see this even nicer version.) The Learning R post shows how to grab the crayon colors from the wikipedia page, “List of Crayola crayon colors,” directly in R. Here’s […]

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Nicholas Wade and the paradox of racism

May 9, 2014
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The paradox of racism is that at any given moment, the racism of the day seems reasonable and very possibly true, but the racism of the past always seems so ridiculous. I’ve been thinking about this for a few months ever since receiving in the mail a new book, “A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race, and […] The post Nicholas Wade and the paradox of racism appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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stopping rule impact

May 8, 2014
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stopping rule impact

Here is a question from my friend Shravan Vasishth about the consequences of using a stopping rule: Psycholinguists and psychologists often adopt the following type of data-gathering procedure: The experimenter gathers n data points, then checks for significance (p<0.05 or not). If it’s not significant, he gets more data (n more data points). Since time […]

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UCL Biostats Network Symposium 3

May 8, 2014
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UCL Biostats Network Symposium 3

We've finalised the line up for the next UCL Biostatistics Network Symposium on "Contemporary Statistical Methods in Medical Research".This year we'll have two sessions:1. Risk prediction models  in Health research $-$ Ian White, MRC Biostati...

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Two more points about crayon colors

May 8, 2014
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Two more points about crayon colors

If you want to use crayon colors in R but you don’t want to rely on my R/broman package, you can just grab the code. Copy the relevant lines from the R/brocolors.R file: I spent a bit of time thinking about how best to sort the colors in a meaningful way, for the plot_crayons() function. […]

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Implementing PMFs in Python

May 8, 2014
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Implementing PMFs in Python

Last year I gave a keynote talk at PyCon Taiwan called "Python Epistemology," and I wrote this blog article about it.  The video is here, but unfortunately the sound quality is poor.  In the talk, I demonstrate the use of a Counter, one ...

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Discussion with Steven Pinker on research that is attached to data that are so noisy as to be essentially uninformative

May 8, 2014
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I pointed Steven Pinker to my post, How much time (if any) should we spend criticizing research that’s fraudulent, crappy, or just plain pointless?, and he responded: Clearly it *is* important to call out publicized research whose conclusions are likely to be false. The only danger is that it’s so easy and fun to criticize, […] The post Discussion with Steven Pinker on research that is attached to data that…

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How effective visualization brings data alive

May 8, 2014
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How effective visualization brings data alive

Back in 2009, I wrote about a failed attempt to visualize regional dialects in the U.S. (link). The raw data came from Bert Vaux's surveys. I recently came across some fantastic maps based on the same data. Here's one: These...

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ARIMA models with long lags

May 8, 2014
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ARIMA models with long lags

Today’s email question: I work within a government budget office and sometimes have to forecast fairly simple time series several quarters into the future. Auto.arima() works great and I often get something along the lines of: ARIMA(0,0,1)(1,1,0)[12] with drift as the lowest AICc. However, my boss (who does not use R) takes issue with low-order AR and MA because “you’re essentially using forecasted data to make your forecast.” His models…

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A comment on “We cannot afford to study effect size in the lab” from the DataColada blog

May 8, 2014
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In a recent post on the DataColada blog, Uri Simonsohn wrote about “We cannot afford to study effect size in the lab“. The central message is: If we want accurate effect size (ES) estimates, we need large sample sizes (he suggests four-digi...

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A. Spanos: Talking back to the critics using error statistics (Phil6334)

May 7, 2014
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A. Spanos: Talking back to the critics using error statistics (Phil6334)

Aris Spanos’ overview of error statistical responses to familiar criticisms of statistical tests. Related reading is Mayo and Spanos (2011) Filed under: Error Statistics, frequentist/Bayesian, Phil6334, reforming the reformers, statistical test...

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Crayon colors in R

May 7, 2014
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Crayon colors in R

Last night I was working on a talk on creating effective graphs. Mostly, I needed to update the colors, as there’d been some gaudy ones in its previous form (e.g., slide 22). I usually pick colors using the crayons in the Mac Color Picker. But that has just 40 crayons, and I wanted more choices. […]

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Stan users meetup next week

May 7, 2014
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We have a Stan users meetup for NYC. We’ll have monthly sessions where we can discuss modeling, success stories, pain points, and really have a chance for the user base and the developers to interact in NYC. The first meetup will be on Tuesday, 5/13. I’ll be giving a overview of Stan aimed at a […] The post Stan users meetup next week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Once more on nonparametric measures of mutual information

May 7, 2014
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Ben Murell writes: Our reply to Kinney and Atwal has come out (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/04/29/1403623111.full.pdf) along with their response (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/04/29/1404661111.full.pdf). I feel like they somewhat missed the point. If you’re still interested in this line of discussion, feel free to post, and maybe the Murrells and Kinney can bash it out in your comments! Background: Too many […] The post Once more on nonparametric measures of mutual information appeared first on Statistical…

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Why big data is in trouble: they forgot about applied statistics

May 7, 2014
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Why big data is in trouble: they forgot about applied statistics

This year the idea that statistics is important for big data has exploded into the popular media. Here are a few examples, starting with the Lazer et. al paper in Science that got the ball rolling on this idea. The … Continue reading →

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Cause he thinks he’s so-phisticated

May 7, 2014
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This story (“Yale tells students to keep Kissinger talk secret . . . ‘Dr. Kissinger’s visit to campus will not be publicized, so we appreciate your confidentiality…’”) reminds me of two things: - In the 1980s, I once went to a public lecture at Harvard by Kissinger protogé Ted Koppel, who indeed has that deep […] The post Cause he thinks he’s so-phisticated appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Navel-gazing at airfare data

May 7, 2014
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It seems like Seth Kugel's article in the New York Times about "Crunching the Numbers to find the Best Airfare" is quite popular. In this article, he said things like this: The overall take on the best day to book tickets turns out to be somewhat underwhelming, if you look at the country as a whole. Hopper’s data shows it’s actually Thursday, but don’t expect that fact to save you…

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This article is actually fastidious: How spammers generate random comments for blogs

May 7, 2014
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This article is actually fastidious: How spammers generate random comments for blogs

Last week Chris Hemedinger posted an article about spam that is sent to SAS blogs and discussed how anti-spam software helps to block spam. No algorithm can be 100% accurate at distinguishing spam from valid comments because of the inherent trade-off between specificity and sensitivity in any statistical test. Therefore, […]

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