A plot of ‘Who works at home’

January 3, 2016
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A plot of ‘Who works at home’

I ran across this post containing displays on who works from home. I must say it looks great and is interactive but it did not help me understand the data. So I created this post to display the same data with a boring plot which might help me. For...

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Endogeneity-Robust OLS Estimation (?)

January 2, 2016
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Imagine White-style robust OLS inference, but with robustness to endogeneity as opposed to heteroskedasticity/autocorrelation (or maybe even robustness to all three).  It sounds too good to be true.  Actually, it sounds impossible, and even i...

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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

January 2, 2016
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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

Nadia Hassan writes: Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs. This [from Javier Zarracina] is not a stand-out on that front, but it is far from ideal: A lot of buzz in recent years about data journalism or quantitative journalism. There is a lot of issues to be […] The post “Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you…

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Blog about Stats 2015 in review

January 1, 2016
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Blog about Stats 2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 14,000 times in 2015. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 5 sold-out performances for that many … Continue reading Blog about Stats 2015 in review

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Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis, despite lack of evidence”

January 1, 2016
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Paul Alper points us to this scary news article by Susan Perry: Calcium and vitamin D supplements have been shown repeatedly to have no beneficial effect on preventing or treating osteoporosis . . . In fact, the evidence has not only demonstrated that calcium and vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of bone […] The post Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and…

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“Why researchers keep citing retracted papers”

January 1, 2016
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Lucas Estevam points us to this interesting article by Keith Collins. The post “Why researchers keep citing retracted papers” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Midnight With Birnbaum (Happy New Year)

December 31, 2015
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Midnight With Birnbaum (Happy New Year)

 Just as in the past 4 years since I’ve been blogging, I revisit that spot in the road at 11p.m., just outside the Elbar Room, get into a strange-looking taxi, and head to “Midnight With Birnbaum”. (The pic on the left is the only blurry image I have of the club I’m taken to.) I wonder […]

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(A pointer to) bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

December 31, 2015
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(A pointer to) bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

Screen shot from bayes.js blog post.This is just a pointer to a new post at Rasmus Bååth's Blog that might interest readers of DBDA2E. bayes.js: A small JavaScript library that implements an adaptive MCMC sampler and a couple of probability distribut...

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Top posts of 2015

December 31, 2015
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Here they are: What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied to statistics education Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing from foreign students What to do in […] The post Top posts of 2015 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Happy New Year

December 31, 2015
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Happy New Year

Socks are more than you might think. The proof is in Netflix Socks for Statistics And the next step could be: Waking up all users of statistics if they fall asleep and miss the essential data for decision making. Happy socks and a Happy new Year to yo...

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bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

December 30, 2015
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Bayesian data analysis is cool, Markov chain Monte Carlo is the cool technique that makes Bayesian data analysis possible, and wouldn’t it be coolness if you could do all of this in the browser? That was what I thought, at least, and I’ve now made bayes.js: A small JavaScript library that implements an adaptive MCMC sampler and a couple of probability distributions, and that makes it relatively easy to implement…

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Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV

December 30, 2015
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Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV

Paul Alper points us to this in-depth article by Steven Brill on the topic of Alex Gorsky, the pharma executive who notoriously marketed a dangerous drug and hid the evidence of its dangers. The headline was a bit of a cheat, though. The story is fascinating from a statistical perspective but it has no chess […] The post Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV appeared first on Statistical…

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The Econometric Game, 2016

December 30, 2015
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The Econometric Game, 2016

I like to think of The Econometric Game as the World Championship of Econometrics.There have been 16 annual Econometric Games to date, and some of these have been featured previously in this blog. For instance in 2015 there were several posts, such as ...

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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

December 30, 2015
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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

I've been working on a Shiny app and wanted to display some math equations. It's possible to use LaTeX to show math using MathJax, as shown in this example from the makers of Shiny. However, by default, MathJax does not allow in-line equations, becau...

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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

December 30, 2015
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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

I've been working on a Shiny app and wanted to display some math equations. It's possible to use LaTeX to show math using MathJax, as shown in this example from the makers of Shiny. However, by default, MathJax does not allow in-line equations, because the dollar sign is used so frequently. But I needed to use in-line math in my application. Fortunately, the folks who make MathJax show how to…

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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

December 30, 2015
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Write in-line equations in your Shiny application with MathJax

I've been working on a Shiny app and wanted to display some math equations. It's possible to use LaTeX to show math using MathJax, as shown in this example from the makers of Shiny. However, by default, MathJax does not allow in-line equations, because the dollar sign is used so frequently. But I needed to use in-line math in my application. Fortunately, the folks who make MathJax show how to…

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Requests I Ignore

December 30, 2015
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Requests I Ignore

About six months ago I wrote a post titled, "Readers' Forum Page".Part of my explanation for the creation of the page was as follows:"Every day, readers post (or attempt to post) lots of "comments" on the various posts on this blog. In many cases, thes...

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Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place

December 30, 2015
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From the Stan users list: I have just started to look into the output of the optimizing function and it seems to give estimates slightly different than the ones that I had previously obtained through maximum likelihood estimation (using MATLAB). Can you please tell me what is the penatly that the LBFGS algorithm imposes? In […] The post Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place…

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Starting a career in data science

December 30, 2015
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Starting a career in data science

I received this email from one of my undergraduate students: I’m writing to you asking for advice on how to start a career in Data Science. Other professions seem a bit more straight forward, in that accountants for example simply look for Inter...

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Job Market for Economics Ph.D.’s

December 29, 2015
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Job Market for Economics Ph.D.’s

In a post in today's Inside Higher Ed, Scott Jaschik discusses the latest annual jobs report from the American Economic Association.Ne notes:"A new report by the American Economic Association found that its listings for jobs for economics Ph.D.s increa...

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Guess what today’s kids are clicking on: My presentation at the Electronic Conference on Teaching Statistics

December 29, 2015
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Changing everything at once: Student-centered Learning, computerized practice exercises, evaluation of student progress, and a modern syllabus to create a completely new introductory statistics course Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics, Columbia University It should be possible to improve the much-despised introductory statistics course in several ways: (1) altering the classroom experience toward active learning, (2) […] The post Guess what today’s kids are clicking on: My presentation at the Electronic…

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On deck this week

December 29, 2015
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A day late already, sorry . . . Tues: Guess what today’s kids are clicking on: My presentation at the Electronic Conference on Teaching Statistics Wed: Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place Thurs: Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV Fri: Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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