“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
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I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]The post “Tragedy of the science-communication commons” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
By

I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

Read more »

“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
By

I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

Read more »

“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
By

I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

Read more »

Where is the King? Live Crowd Visualization of Amsterdam

April 30, 2013
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Where is the King? Live Crowd Visualization of Amsterdam

Waar is de Koning? [waarisdekoning.nl], which can be translated as "Where is the King", was designed by Interactive Design Agency Clever Franke to map the movements and activities of the crowds as they gather in the city of Amsterdam today. Based on ...

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Here is Today: Comparing One Day to One Eon

April 30, 2013
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Here is Today: Comparing One Day to One Eon

Here is Today [hereistoday.com] by graphic designer Luke Twyman is a simple yet elegant timeline rendition that puts into context the different scales of time. Ranging from one day to one eon, and framing the time periods different kinds of species ...

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How to change the alpha value of colours in R

April 30, 2013
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How to change the alpha value of colours in R

Often I like to reduce the alpha value (level of transparency) of colours to identify patterns of over-plotting when displaying lots of data points with R. So, here is a tiny function that allows me to add an alpha value to a given vector of colours, ...

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What should philosophers of science do? (Higgs, statistics, Marilyn)

April 30, 2013
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What should philosophers of science do? (Higgs, statistics, Marilyn)

My colleague, Lydia Patton, sent me this interesting article, “The Philosophy of the Higgs,” (from The Guardian, March 24, 2013) when I began the posts on “statistical flukes” in relation to the Higgs experiments (here and here); I held off posting it partly because of the slightly sexist attention-getter pic  of Marilyn (in reference to an “irrelevant […]

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Giving credit where due

April 30, 2013
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Gregg Easterbrook may not always be on the ball, but I 100% endorse the last section of his recent column (scroll down to “Absurd Specificity Watch”). Earlier in the column, Easterbrook has a plug for Tim Tebow. I’d forgotten about T...

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A Brief Tour of the Trees and Forests

April 29, 2013
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A Brief Tour of the Trees and Forests

Tree methods such as CART (classification and regression trees) can be used as alternatives to logistic regression. It is a way that can be used to show the probability of being in any hierarchical group. The following is a compilation of many of the key R packages that cover trees and forests.  The goal here […]

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And now: Semantic Statistics (SemStats)

April 29, 2013
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And now: Semantic Statistics (SemStats)

Official Statistics has a long tradition in creating and providing high-quality metadata. And the Semantic Web needs just this: metadata! …Continue reading »

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The Great Race

April 29, 2013
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This post is by Phil. Last summer my wife and I took a 3.5-month vacation that included a wide range of activities. When I got back, people would ask “what were the highlights or your trip?”, and I was somewhat at a loss: we had done so many things that were so different, many of [...]The post The Great Race appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Methods before results

April 29, 2013
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Methods before results

It’s great that, in a step towards improved reproducibility, the Nature journals are removing page limits on Methods sections: To allow authors to describe their experimental designs and methods in enough detail for others to interpret and replicate them, the participating journals are removing length restrictions on Methods sections. But couldn’t they include the Methods […]

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R Is Not So Hard! A Tutorial, Part 4 (repost)

April 29, 2013
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Part 3 we used the lm() command to perform least squares regressions. In Part 4 we will look at more advanced aspects of regression models and see what R has to offer. One way of checking for non-linearity in your data is to fit a polynomial model and check whether the polynomial model fits the data better than a linear model. Or you may wish to fit a quadratic or…

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R Is Not So Hard! A Tutorial, Part 4 (repost)

April 29, 2013
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The following is not a Stats Make Me Cry original, but rather something I came across and found very useful. The article demonstrates how to examine non-linear effects (e.g. quadratic effects) using a regression model in R. If you are interested in the...

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The blogroll

April 29, 2013
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The blogroll

I encourage you to check out our linked blogs. Here’s what they’re all about: Cognitive and Behavioral Science BPS Research Digest: I haven’t been following this one recently, but it has lots of good links, I should probably check it more often. There are a couple things that bother me, though. The blog is sponsored [...]The post The blogroll appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Figuring out the location (of the data)

April 29, 2013
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Figuring out the location (of the data)

When we visualize data, we want to expose the information contained within, or to use the terminology Nate Silver popularized, to expose the signal and leave behind the noise. When graphs are not done right, sometimes they manage to obscure...

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austerity in MCMC land (#2)

April 29, 2013
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austerity in MCMC land (#2)

After reading the arXiv paper by Korattikara, Chen and Welling, I wondered about the expression of the acceptance step of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm as a mean of log-likelihoods over the sample. More specifically the long sleepless nights at the hospital led me to ponder the rather silly question of the impact of replacing mean by […]

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Understanding local and global variables in the SAS/IML language

April 29, 2013
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Understanding local and global variables in the SAS/IML language

The TV show Cheers was set in a bar "where everybody knows your name." Global knowledge of a name is appealing for a neighborhood pub, but not for a programming language. Most programming languages enable you to define functions that have local variables: variables whose names are known only inside [...]

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Slouching towards simulating investment skill

April 29, 2013
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Slouching towards simulating investment skill

When investment skill is simulated, it is often presented as if it is obvious how to do it.  Maybe I’m wrong, but I don’t think it’s obvious. Previously In “Simple tests of predicted returns” we saw that prediction quality need not look like what you would find in a textbook.  For example, there was a … Continue reading →

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Continuous Values and Baselines

April 29, 2013
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Continuous Values and Baselines

One of the most common mistakes people make when creating charts is to cut off the vertical axis. But why is that a problem? And what can you do when you need to show data where the amount of change is small compared to the absolute values? When we think of continuous data, we almost always think of values that have a meaningful zero. There is no question what an…

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Using the Golden Section Search Method to Minimize the Sum of Absolute Deviations

Using the Golden Section Search Method to Minimize the Sum of Absolute Deviations

Introduction Recently, I introduced the golden search method – a special way to save computation time by modifying the bisection method with the golden ratio – and I illustrated how to minimize a cusped function with this script.  I also wrote an R function to implement this method and an R script to apply this method […]

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MOOCs–a low-risk way to explore outside your field

April 29, 2013
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MOOCs–a low-risk way to explore outside your field

One of the things I'm realizing from Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) -- those online free classes from universities that have seem to sprung up from almost nowhere in the last year and a half -- is that they offer a perfect opportunity to explore...

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