Perspektive statt Befristung: Für mehr feste Arbeitsplätze im Wissenschaftsbereich

May 16, 2014
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Exzellente Hintergrundinformation gibt es auch im Blog von Markus Dahlem, z.B.: [1], [2], oder [3]. Facebook-Gruppe: https://www.facebook.com/akademischeJuniorposition Folgende Abbildung sagt eigentlich alles: (R.Kreckel, Habilitation vs. Tenure Track,...

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More on the Properties of the "Adjusted" Coefficient of Determination

May 15, 2014
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More on the Properties of the "Adjusted" Coefficient of Determination

A while back I wrote about the fact that R2 (the coefficient of determination for a linear regression model) is a sample statistic, and as such it has a sampling distribution. In that post and in follow-up posts here and here, I discussed some of ...

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Upcoming New York Data Events (Summer, 2014)

May 15, 2014
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I'm going to be in NYC for the summer, so I was interested to know whether there are any events...

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hipsteR: re-educating people who learned R before it was cool

May 15, 2014
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hipsteR: re-educating people who learned R before it was cool

This morning, I started a tutorial for folks whose knowledge of R is (like mine) stuck in 2001. Yesterday I started reading the Rcpp book, and on page 4 there’s an example using the R function replicate, which (a) I’d never heard before, and (b) is super useful. I mean, I often write code like […]

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The Mind Is Flat! So Stop Overfitting Choice Models

May 15, 2014
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The Mind Is Flat! So Stop Overfitting Choice Models

Conjoint analysis and choice modeling rely on repeated observations from the same individuals across many different scenarios where the features have been systematically manipulated in order to estimate the impact of varying each feature. We believe th...

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qqman: an R package for creating Q-Q and manhattan plots from GWAS results

May 15, 2014
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qqman: an R package for creating Q-Q and manhattan plots from GWAS results

Three years ago I wrote a blog post on how to create manhattan plots in R. After hundreds of comments pointing out bugs and other issues, I've finally cleaned up this code and turned it into an R package.The qqman R package is on CRAN: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/qqman/The source code is on GitHub: https://github.com/stephenturner/qqmanIf you'd like to cite the qqman package (appreciated but not required), please cite this pre-print: Turner, S.D. qqman: an R package…

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Bill Easterly vs. Jeff Sachs: What percentage of the recipients didn’t use the free malaria bed nets in Zambia?

May 15, 2014
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Bill Easterly vs. Jeff Sachs: What percentage of the recipients didn’t use the free malaria bed nets in Zambia?

I came across this from Jeff Sachs: [Bill Easterly in his 2006 book] went on to write that “a study of a program to hand out free [malaria bed] nets in Zambia to people … found that 70 percent of the recipients didn’t use the nets.” Yet this particular study, which was conducted by the […] The post Bill Easterly vs. Jeff Sachs: What percentage of the recipients didn’t use…

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understanding complex and large industrial data (UCLID 2014)

May 15, 2014
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understanding complex and large industrial data (UCLID 2014)

Just received this announcement of the UCLID 2014 conference in Lancaster, July 1-2 2014: Understanding Complex and Large Industrial Data 2014, or UCLID, is a workshop which aims to provide an opportunity for academic researchers and industrial practitioners to work together and share ideas on the fast developing field of ‘big data’ analysis. This is […]

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The ivlewbel Package. A new way to Tackle Endogenous Regressor Models.

May 15, 2014
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The ivlewbel Package. A new way to Tackle Endogenous Regressor Models.

In April 2012, I wrote this blog post demonstrating an approach proposed in Lewbel (2012) that identifies endogenous regressor coefficients in a linear triangular system. Now I am happy to announce the release of the ivlewbel package, which contains a function through which Lewbel’s method can be applied in R. This package is now available […]

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The ivlewbel Package. A new way to Tackle Endogenous Regressor Models.

May 15, 2014
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The ivlewbel Package. A new way to Tackle Endogenous Regressor Models.

In April 2012, I wrote this blog post demonstrating an approach proposed in Lewbel (2012) that identifies endogenous regressor coefficients in a linear triangular system. Now I am happy to announce the release of the ivlewbel package, which contains a function through which Lewbel’s method can be applied in R. This package is now available […]

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Interpreting Confidence Intervals

May 14, 2014
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Interpreting Confidence Intervals

I enjoyed William M. Briggs' ("Statistician to the Stars") post today: "Frequentists are Closet Bayesians: Confidence Interval Edition". Getting your head around the (correct) interpretation of a confidence interval can be difficult for students. Try t...

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Robust in one sense, sensitive in another

May 14, 2014
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-+*When you sort data and look at which sample falls in a particular position, that’s called order statistics. For example, you might want to know the smallest, largest, or middle value. Order statistics are robust in a sense. The median of a sample, for example, is a very robust measure of central tendency. If Bill […]

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“The subtle funk of just a little poultry offal”

May 14, 2014
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“The subtle funk of just a little poultry offal”

Today’s item mixes two of my favorite themes in a horrible way, sort of like a Reese’s Cup but combining brussels sprouts and liver instead of peanut butter and chocolate. In this case, the disturbing flavors that go together are plagiarism (you know what that is) and the publication filter (the idea that there should […] The post “The subtle funk of just a little poultry offal” appeared first on…

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The trouble with some journal-published papers

May 14, 2014
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The trouble with some journal-published papers

In the popular science genre, one often comes across "published in a peer-reviewed journal" as a certificate of authenticity. Given that the authors of such reports or books typically do not have the technical chops to understand the materials deeply, it's not a surprise that they require third-party validation. However, "published in a peer-reviewed journal" is pretty weak. I just read a paper published in a peer reviewed journal that…

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Tips for concatenating strings in SAS/IML

May 14, 2014
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Tips for concatenating strings in SAS/IML

Last week, as part of an article on how spammers generate comments for blogs, I showed how to generate random messages by using the CATX function in the DATA step. In that example, the strings were scalar quantities, but you can also concatenate vectors of strings in the SAS/IML language. […]

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Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead: making the switch to Python 3

Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead: making the switch to Python 3

Python 3 has been out since 2008 (and realistically usable since 2009). In spite of this four year availability period, Python 3 use has yet to see widespread adoption, particularly among groups in the scientific community. In the company of… Continue reading →

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RSS Young Statisticians Writing Competition

May 13, 2014
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RSS Young Statisticians Writing Competition

Significance and the Young Statisticians Section of the Royal Statistical Society host an annual competition to promote and encourage top-class writing about statistics. This year’s competition closes on 30 May 2014.Here is link to an article on the ...

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Publications of George Box

May 13, 2014
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Publications of George Box

I can't imagine that there are any econometricians who have not heard of George Box - if only in the context of Box-Jenkins time-series analysis, or the Box-Cox transformation. To honour his memory and his many contributions to statistics, the pub...

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The mystery of the official inflation rate

May 13, 2014
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In case you are not subscribed to my dataviz feed, I put up a post yesterday that is highly relevant to readers here interested in statistical topics. The post discusses a graphic of a New York Times article that interprets the official inflation rate (known as the CPI). I devoted an entire chapter of Numbersense (link)to the question of why the official inflation rate diverges from our everyday experience. In…

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CFP: AusDM 2014 – the 12th Australasian Data Mining Conference

May 13, 2014
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CFP: AusDM 2014 – the 12th Australasian Data Mining Conference

********************************************************* 12th Australasian Data Mining Conference (AusDM 2014) Brisbane, Australia 27-28 November 2014 http://ausdm14.ausdm.org/ ********************************************************* Data Mining is the art and science of intelligent analysis of (usually big) data sets for meaningful insights. Data mining is actively applied across all … Continue reading →

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Personally, I’d rather go with Teragram

May 13, 2014
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This one stunned me but perhaps will be no surprise to those of you who are under 30. Laura Wattenberg writes: I live in a state where a baby girl is more likely to be named Margaret than Nevaeh. Let me restate that: I live in the only state where a baby girl is more […] The post Personally, I’d rather go with Teragram appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Non-negative unbiased estimators

May 13, 2014
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Non-negative unbiased estimators

Hey hey, With Alexandre Thiéry we’ve been working on non-negative unbiased estimators for a while now. Since I’ve been talking about it at conferences and since we’ve just arXived the second version of the article, it’s time for a blog post. This post is kind of a follow-up of a previous post from July, where […]

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Questions on the business analytics jobs

May 13, 2014
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Questions on the business analytics jobs

I’ve received a few questions on the business analytics jobs advertised last week. I think it is best if I answer them here so other potential candidates can have the same information. I will add to this post if I receive more questions. 1. What are your expectations in terms of outputs (KPIs)? Typically, a person at Level B (Lecturer) in our department would be producing at least one refereed article in…

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