Python and R: Basic Sampling Problem

April 16, 2015
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In this post, I would like to share a simple problem about sampling analysis. And I will demonstrate how to solve this using Python and R. The first two problems are originally from Sampling: Design and Analysis book by Sharon Lohr.ProblemsLet $N=6$ an...

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Recommending Recommender Systems When Preferences Are Not Driven By Simple Features

April 15, 2015
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Recommending Recommender Systems When Preferences Are Not Driven By Simple Features

Why does lifting out a slice make the pizza appear more appealing?We can begin our discussion with the ultimate feature bundle - pizza toppings. Technically, a menu would only need to list all the toppings and allow the customers to build their own piz...

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Item-response and ideal point models

April 15, 2015
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To continue from today’s class, here’s what we’ll be discussing next time: – Estimating the direction and the magnitude of the discrimination parameters. – How to tell when your data don’t fit the model. – When does ideal-point modeling make a difference? Comparing ideal-point estimates to simple averages of survey responses. P.S. Unlike the previous […] The post Item-response and ideal point models appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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My Favourite Book

April 15, 2015
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My Favourite Book

Well, perhaps it's not really my favourite book, but it's certainly right up there with the most heavily thumbed tomes on my office bookshelf.I'm referring to Tables of Integrals, Series and Products, by Gradshteyn and Ryzhik. I picked up a used copy o...

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Link: Design and Redesign in Data Visualization

April 15, 2015
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Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg have written a wonderful piece titled Design and Redesign in Data Visualization about criticism in data visualization. They thoughtfully analyze the practice and point out some of the issues when people create redesigns, including intellectual honesty and perfect hindsight. They then go on to define some “rules of engagement” for a more … Continue reading Link: Design and Redesign in Data Visualization

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A message I just sent to my class

April 15, 2015
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I wanted to add some context to what we talked about in class today. Part of the message I was sending was that there are some stupid things that get published and you should be careful about that: don’t necessarily believe something, just cos it’s statistically significant and published in a top journal. And, sure, […] The post A message I just sent to my class appeared first on Statistical…

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Two hour marathon by 2041 — probably

April 15, 2015
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Two hour marathon by 2041 — probably

Last fall I taught an introduction to Bayesian statistics at Olin College.  My students worked on some excellent projects, and I invited them to write up their results as guest articles for this blog.  Previous articles in the series are:Baye...

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Hello to St. Louis readers

April 15, 2015
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Hello to St. Louis readers

I'll be hosting a Data Visualization workshop at the Digital Media Marketing Conference in St. Louis, Missouri on Thursday. Here is the link to their website. The workshop is arranged from three themes: Appreciating, Conceptualizing, and Improving. There will be...

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The distribution of Pythagorean triples by angle

April 15, 2015
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The distribution of Pythagorean triples by angle

Last week I was chatting with some mathematicians and I mentioned the blog post that I wrote last year on the distribution of Pythagorean triples. In my previous article, I showed that there is an algorithm that uses matrix multiplication to generate every primitive Pythagorean triple by starting with the […]

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Doing Bayesian data analysis again at Bernoulli’s grave

April 14, 2015
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Doing Bayesian data analysis again at Bernoulli’s grave

The 2nd Edition of the book visited the grave of Jacob Bernoulli (1655-1705) in Basel, Switzerland. Jacob Bernoulli pre-dated Bayes (1701-1761), of course, but Bernoulli established foundational concepts and theorems of probability. The photos below we...

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Bernoulli, Montmort and Waldegrave

April 14, 2015
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Bernoulli, Montmort and Waldegrave

In the last issue of Statistical Science, David Belhouse [author of De Moivre’s biography]  and Nicolas Fillion published an accounting of a discussion between Pierre Rémond de Montmort, Nicolaus Bernoulli—”the” Bernoulli associated with the St. Petersburg paradox—, and Francis Waldegrave, about the card game of Le Her (or Hère, for wretch). Here is the abridged […]

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Helicopter parenting because your mind is "terrible at statistics" (or, rather, you are unaware of the denominator)

April 14, 2015
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Helicopter parenting because your mind is "terrible at statistics" (or, rather, you are unaware of the denominator)

In Megan McArdle's Seven Reasons We Hate Free-Range Parenting - Bloomberg View:, she states that because of the news cycle, and because our minds are terrible at statistics, we think the world is a much less safe place than 30 years ago. It's true...

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Regression Coefficients & Units of Measurement

April 14, 2015
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Regression Coefficients & Units of Measurement

A linear regression equation is just that - an equation. This means that when any of the variables - dependent or explanatory - have units of measurement, we also have to keep track of the units of measurement for the estimated regression coefficients....

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“For better or for worse, academics are fascinated by academic rankings . . .”

April 14, 2015
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I was asked to comment on a forthcoming article, “Statistical Modeling of Citation Exchange Among Statistics Journals,” by Christiano Varin, Manuela Cattelan and David Firth. Here’s what I wrote: For better or for worse, academics are fascinated by academic rankings, perhaps because most of us reached our present positions through a series of tournaments, starting […] The post “For better or for worse, academics are fascinated by academic rankings .…

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Plotting tables alsongside charts in R

April 14, 2015
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Plotting tables alsongside charts in R

Occasionally I'd like to plot a table alongside a chart in R, e.g. to present summary statistics of the graph itself. Thanks to the gridExtra package this is quite straightforward. The function tableGrob creates a table like plot of a data frame, while...

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Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

April 14, 2015
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Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

Start Spreading the News…..  The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference, 2015 APS Annual Convention Saturday, May 23  2:00 PM- 3:50 PM in Wilder (Marriott Marquis 1535 B’way)     Andrew Gelman Professor of Statistics & Political Science Columbia University Stephen Senn Head of Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS) […]

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failures and uses of Jaynes’ principle of transformation groups

April 13, 2015
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failures and uses of Jaynes’ principle of transformation groups

This paper by Alon Drory was arXived last week when I was at Columbia. It reassesses Jaynes’ resolution of Bertrand’s paradox, which finds three different probabilities for a given geometric event depending on the underlying σ-algebra (or definition of randomness!). Both Poincaré and Jaynes argued against Bertrand that there was only one acceptable solution under […]

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Why is there so much university administration? We kind of asked for it.

April 13, 2015
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The latest commentary on the rising cost of college tuition is by Paul F. Campos and is titled The Real Reason College Tuition Costs So Much. There has been much debate about this article and whether Campos is right or wrong...and I don't plan to add to that. However, I wanted to pick up on

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Conflict of interest

April 13, 2015
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Conflict of interest

Disclaimer: I'm fully aware of the obvious conflict of interest here, but also I think that this looks really good, so I'll write about it anyway.This post is to highlight that Marta's and Michela's book on Spatial and Spatio-temporal Bayesian Mod...

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Quantifying uncertainty

April 13, 2015
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The primary way to quantify uncertainty is to use probability. Subject to certain axioms that aim to capture common-sense rules for quantifying uncertainty, probability theory is essentially the only way. (This is Cox’s theorem.) Other methods, such as fuzzy logic, may be useful, though they must violate common sense (at least as defined by Cox’s theorem) […]

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Why do we communicate probability calculations so poorly, even when we know how to do it better?

April 13, 2015
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Haynes Goddard writes: I thought to do some reading in psychology on why Bayesian probability seems so counterintuitive, and making it difficult for many to learn and apply. Indeed, that is the finding of considerable research in psychology. It turns out that it is counterintuitive because of the way it is presented, following no doubt […] The post Why do we communicate probability calculations so poorly, even when we know…

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Genomics Case Studies Online Courses Start in Two Weeks (4/27)

April 13, 2015
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The last month of the HarvardX Data Analysis for Genomics series start on 4/27. We will cover case studies on RNAseq, Variant calling, ChipSeq and DNA methylation. Faculty includes Shirley Liu, Mike Love, Oliver Hoffman and the HSPH Bioinformatics Core. Although taking the previous courses on the series will help, the four case study courses

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DO loop = 1 TO 600;

April 13, 2015
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DO loop = 1 TO 600;

Today is my 600th blog post for The DO Loop. I have written about many topics that are related to statistical programming, math, statistics, simulation, numerical analysis, matrix computations, and more. The right sidebar of my blog contains a tag cloud that links to many topics. What topics do you, […]

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