7 ways to separate errors from statistics

May 2, 2013
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7 ways to separate errors from statistics

Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers have been inspired by the recent Reinhardt and Rogoff debacle to list “six ways to separate lies from statistics” in economics research: 1. “Focus on how robust a finding is, meaning that different ways of looking at the evidence point to the same conclusion.” 2. Don’t confuse statistical with practical [...]The post 7 ways to separate errors from statistics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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A gift from the NY Times Graphics team

May 2, 2013
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A gift from the NY Times Graphics team

This post is long over-due. I have been meaning to write about this blog for a long time but never got around to it. It's like the email response you postponed because you want to think before you fire it...

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Why the Obsession with Tables?

May 2, 2013
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Lots of data are still presented and released as tables. But why, when we know that visual representations are so much easier to read and understand? Eric Newburger from the U.S. Census Bureau has an interesting theory. In a short talk on visualization at the Census Bureau, he describes how in the 1880s, the Census published maps and charts. Many of those are actually amazingly well done, even by today’s…

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R for dummies

May 1, 2013
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R for dummies

I already mentioned R for dummies a while ago on the ‘Og and never got around to read it from cover to back. Now that I am reduced to a dummy state with too much free time!, I can produce a full review of the book. R for dummies was written by two Belgian statistics […]

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Logistic Ordinal Regression

May 1, 2013
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Logistic Ordinal Regression

TL;DR: I've implemented a logistic ordinal regression or proportional odds model. Here is the Python code The logistic ordinal regression model, also known as the proportional odds was introduced in the early 80s by McCullagh [1, 2] and is a generali...

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A pathological glm() problem that doesn’t issue a warning

May 1, 2013
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A pathological glm() problem that doesn’t issue a warning

I know I have already written a lot about technicalities in logistic regression (see for example: How robust is logistic regression? and Newton-Raphson can compute an average). But I just ran into a simple case where R‘s glm() implementation of logistic regression seems to fail without issuing a warning message. Yes the data is a […] Related posts: Newton-Raphson can compute an average How robust is logistic regression? What does…

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A graph at war with its caption. Also, how to visualize the same numbers without giving the display a misleading causal feel?

May 1, 2013
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A graph at war with its caption.  Also, how to visualize the same numbers without giving the display a misleading causal feel?

Kaiser Fung discusses the following graph that is captioned, “A study of 54 nations–ranked below–found that those with more progressive tax rates had happier citizens, on average.” As Kaiser writes, “from a purely graphical perspective, the chart is well executed . . . they have 54 points, and the chart still doesn’t look too crammed [...]The post A graph at war with its caption. Also, how to visualize the same…

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Mid-week light entertainment: The Economist imitates USA Today

May 1, 2013
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Mid-week light entertainment: The Economist imitates USA Today

The Economist imitates USA Today, but without the whimsy. Joe D. submitted this via Twitter. (link)

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Le Monde puzzle [#818]

April 30, 2013
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Le Monde puzzle [#818]

The current puzzle is as follows: Define the symmetric of an integer as the integer obtained by inverting the order of its digits, eg 4321 is the symmetric of 1234. What are the numbers for which the square is equal to the symmetric of the square of the symmetric? I first consulted stackexchange to find […]

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Missing tikzDevice

April 30, 2013
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I love using tikzDevice. When preparing LaTeX documents I switched to prepare all graphs in GNU R and then port them to TeX using tikzDevice. Recently I have moved to GNU R 3.0.0 and was shocked to find that this package is no longer available on CRAN....

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What the BBC isn’t telling you

April 30, 2013
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What the BBC isn’t telling you

Yesterday Gareth pointed me to this article on the BBC website. The underlying story has to do with Meredith Kercher's murder and the subsequent trial involving mainly her flat-mate Amanda Knox, in Perugia (Italy). As often in these grue...

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Kalkalash! Pinpointing the Moments “The Simpsons” became less Cromulent

April 30, 2013
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Kalkalash! Pinpointing the Moments “The Simpsons” became less Cromulent

Whenever somebody mentions “The Simpsons” it always stirs up feelings of nostalgia in me. The characters, uproarious gags, zingy one-liners, and edgy animation all contributed towards making, arguably, the greatest TV ever. However, it’s easy to forget that as a TV show “The Simpsons” is still ongoing—in its twenty-fourth season no less. For me, and […]

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Reproducibility and reciprocity

April 30, 2013
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One element about the entire discussion about reproducible research that I haven't seen talked about very much is the potential for the lack of reciprocity. I think even if scientists were not concerned about the possibility of getting scooped by … Continue reading →

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“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
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I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]The post “Tragedy of the science-communication commons” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
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I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

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“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
By

I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

Read more »

“Tragedy of the science-communication commons”

April 30, 2013
By

I’ve earlier written that science is science communication—that is, the act of communicating scientific ideas and findings to ourselves and others is itself a central part of science. My point was to push against a conventional separation between the act of science and the act of communication, the idea that science is done by scientists [...]

Read more »

Where is the King? Live Crowd Visualization of Amsterdam

April 30, 2013
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Where is the King? Live Crowd Visualization of Amsterdam

Waar is de Koning? [waarisdekoning.nl], which can be translated as "Where is the King", was designed by Interactive Design Agency Clever Franke to map the movements and activities of the crowds as they gather in the city of Amsterdam today. Based on ...

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Here is Today: Comparing One Day to One Eon

April 30, 2013
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Here is Today: Comparing One Day to One Eon

Here is Today [hereistoday.com] by graphic designer Luke Twyman is a simple yet elegant timeline rendition that puts into context the different scales of time. Ranging from one day to one eon, and framing the time periods different kinds of species ...

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How to change the alpha value of colours in R

April 30, 2013
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How to change the alpha value of colours in R

Often I like to reduce the alpha value (level of transparency) of colours to identify patterns of over-plotting when displaying lots of data points with R. So, here is a tiny function that allows me to add an alpha value to a given vector of colours, ...

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What should philosophers of science do? (Higgs, statistics, Marilyn)

April 30, 2013
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What should philosophers of science do? (Higgs, statistics, Marilyn)

My colleague, Lydia Patton, sent me this interesting article, “The Philosophy of the Higgs,” (from The Guardian, March 24, 2013) when I began the posts on “statistical flukes” in relation to the Higgs experiments (here and here); I held off posting it partly because of the slightly sexist attention-getter pic  of Marilyn (in reference to an “irrelevant […]

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Giving credit where due

April 30, 2013
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Gregg Easterbrook may not always be on the ball, but I 100% endorse the last section of his recent column (scroll down to “Absurd Specificity Watch”). Earlier in the column, Easterbrook has a plug for Tim Tebow. I’d forgotten about T...

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A Brief Tour of the Trees and Forests

April 29, 2013
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A Brief Tour of the Trees and Forests

Tree methods such as CART (classification and regression trees) can be used as alternatives to logistic regression. It is a way that can be used to show the probability of being in any hierarchical group. The following is a compilation of many of the key R packages that cover trees and forests.  The goal here […]

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