What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)

March 2, 2015
By
What hypothesis testing is all about.  (Hint:  It’s not what you think.)

I’ve said it before but it’s worth saying again. The conventional view: Hyp testing is all about rejection. The idea is that if you reject the null hyp at the 5% level, you have a win, you have learned that a certain null model is false and science has progressed, either in the glamorous “scientific […] The post What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)…

Read more »

Advanced Statistics for the Life Sciences MOOC Launches Today

March 2, 2015
By

In this four week course we will teach statistical techniques that are commonly used in the analysis of high-throughput data and their corresponding R implementations. In Week 1 we will explain inference in the context of high-throughput data and introduce the concept of error controlling procedures. We will describe the strengths and weakness of the Bonferroni correction,

Read more »

Statistical inference is only mostly wrong

March 2, 2015
By
Statistical inference is only mostly wrong

p-values banned!The journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology (BASP) made news recently by "banning" p-values.  Here's a summary of their major points:"...the null hypothesis significance testing procedure (NHSTP) is invalid...". &nbsp...

Read more »

On deck this week

March 2, 2015
By

Mon: What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.) Rembrandt van Rijn (2) vs. Betrand Russell Tues: One simple trick to make Stan run faster George Carlin (2) vs. Barbara Kruger Wed: I actually think this infographic is ok Bernard-Henry Levy (3) vs. Jacques Derrida Thurs: Defaults, once set, are hard […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Careers in Data Science and Business Analytics: a new course

March 2, 2015
By

Syllabus for one-day seminar on Big Data jobs and careers by Kaiser Fung

Read more »

Course Announcement: Data Visualization Workshop

March 2, 2015
By

The next installment of my data visualization workshop runs from April 7 to May 12 in New York City. My workshop is modeled after a creative writing workshop. The focus of the six weeks is on giving and receiving feedback...

Read more »

Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize!

March 2, 2015
By
Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize!

Last week I received a message from SAS Technical Support saying that a customer's IML program was running slowly. Could I look at it to see whether it could be improved? What I discovered is a good reminder about the importance of vectorizing user-defined modules. The program in this blog […] The post Avoid loops, avoid the APPLY function, vectorize! appeared first on The DO Loop.

Read more »

Modeling Earthquake Dynamics

March 2, 2015
By
Modeling Earthquake Dynamics

In 2012, with Marilou Durand, student at UQAM, we have been working on the seismic gap hypothesis, see e.g. McCann et al. (1978) or Kagan & Jackson (1991), or to be more specific, on the dynamics between earthquakes magnitude (or seismic moment) and inter-occurence durations. Our paper should appear soon in the Journal of Seismology, In this paper, we investigate questions arising in Parsons & Geist (2012). Pseudo causal models connecting magnitudes…

Read more »

To Beware or To Embrace The Prior

March 1, 2015
By
To Beware or To Embrace The Prior

In this guest post, Jeff Rouder reacts to two recent comments skeptical of Bayesian statistics, and describes the importance of the prior in Bayesian statistics. In short: the prior gives a Bayesian model the power to predict data, and prediction is what allows the evaluation of evidence. Far from being a liability, Bayesian priors are what make Bayesian statistics useful to science.Jeff Rouder writes:Bayes' Theorem is about 250 years old. For…

Read more »

Non-trivial wedges

March 1, 2015
By
Non-trivial wedges

During February, I've been really bad at blogging $-$ I've only posted one entry advertising our workshop at the RSS, later this month. I have spent a lot of time working in collaboration with colleagues at UCL and the London School of Hygiene and Trop...

Read more »

“Probabilism as an Obstacle to Statistical Fraud-Busting”

March 1, 2015
By
“Probabilism as an Obstacle to Statistical Fraud-Busting”

“Is the Philosophy of Probabilism an Obstacle to Statistical Fraud Busting?” was my presentation at the 2014 Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science):“Revisiting the Foundations of Statistics in the Era of Big Data: Scaling Up to Meet the Challenge.”    As often happens, I never put these slides into a stand alone paper. But I have […]

Read more »

Buddha (3) vs. John Updike

March 1, 2015
By
Buddha (3) vs. John Updike

Yesterday‘s winner is Friedrich Nietzsche. I don’t really have much to say here: there was lots of enthusiasm about the philosopher and none at all for the cozy comedian. Maybe Jonathan Miller would’ve been a better choice. Now for today’s battle. Buddha is seeded #3 among founders of religions. Updike is the unseeded author of […] The post Buddha (3) vs. John Updike appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

“Precise Answers to the Wrong Questions”

March 1, 2015
By

Our friend K? (not to be confused with X) seeks pre-feedback on this talk: Can we get a mathematical framework for applying statistics that better facilitates communication with non-statisticians as well as helps statisticians avoid getting “precise answers to the wrong questions*”? Applying statistics involves communicating with non-statisticians so that we grasp their applied problems […] The post “Precise Answers to the Wrong Questions” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Should I use premium Diesel? Setup

March 1, 2015
By
Should I use premium Diesel? Setup

Since I drive quite a lot, I have some interest in getting the most km out every Euro spent on fuel. One thing to change is the fuel. The oil companies have a premium fuel, which is supposed to be better for both engine and fuel consumption. On the oth...

Read more »

March Reading List

March 1, 2015
By
March Reading List

Good grief! It's March already. You might enjoy:Bajari, P., D. Nekipelov, S. P. Ryan, and M. Yang, 2015. Demand estimation with machine learning and model combination. NBER Working Paper No, 20955.Baur, D. G. and D. T. Tran, 2014. The long-run relation...

Read more »

Data2Life

February 28, 2015
By
Data2Life

‘Better Data. Better Lives’ is a very well made video about the role of statistics. Everybody agrees that data are …Continue reading →

Read more »

Playing around with #rstats twitter data

February 28, 2015
By
Playing around with #rstats twitter data

As a bit of weekend fun, I decided to briefly look into the #rstats twitter data that Stephen Turner collected and made available (thanks!). Essentially, this data set contains some basic information about over 100,000 tweets that contain the hashtag… Continue reading →

Read more »

Population Countdown

February 28, 2015
By
Population Countdown

I was downloading data from the Statistics New Zealand website the other evening, and was alerted to the fact that an interesting event was about to occur. Here's my screen-capture of the N.Z. "Population Clock" about an hour later:© 2015, David ...

Read more »

Friedrich Nietzsche (4) vs. Alan Bennett

February 28, 2015
By

William Shakespeare had the most support yesterday; for example, from David: “I vote for Shakespeare just to see who actually shows up.” The best argument of the serious variety came from Babar, who wrote, “I would vote for WS. Very little is known about the man. I care very little about Marx’s mannerisms but I’d […] The post Friedrich Nietzsche (4) vs. Alan Bennett appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Bertrand Russell goes to the IRB

February 28, 2015
By

Jonathan Falk points me to this genius idea from Eric Crampton: Here’s a fun one for those of you still based at a university. All of you put together a Human Ethics Review proposal for a field experiment on Human Ethics Review proposals. Here is the proposal within my proposal. Each of you would propose […] The post Bertrand Russell goes to the IRB appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

February 27, 2015
By
Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

The bell rings - time to go to practice. Jarnell Stokes heads over to the gym, changes, and starts warming up with his teammates. It's his Junior year in high school. The Memphis, Tennessee native has a lot on his mind; soon he'll have to mak...

Read more »

William Shakespeare (1) vs. Karl Marx

February 27, 2015
By

For yesterday‘s winner, I’ll follow the reasoning of Manuel in comments: Popper. We would learn more from falsifying the hypothesis that Popper’s talk is boring than what we would learn from falsifying the hypothesis that Richard Pryor’s talk is uninteresting. And today we have the consensus choice for greatest writer vs. the notorious political philosopher. […] The post William Shakespeare (1) vs. Karl Marx appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Does Balancing Classes Improve Classifier Performance?

February 27, 2015
By
Does Balancing Classes Improve Classifier Performance?

It’s a folk theorem I sometimes hear from colleagues and clients: that you must balance the class prevalence before training a classifier. Certainly, I believe that classification tends to be easier when the classes are nearly balanced, especially when the class you are actually interested in is the rarer one. But I have always been … Continue reading Does Balancing Classes Improve Classifier Performance? → Related posts: Don’t use correlation…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe