FRB St. Louis is Far Ahead of the Data Pack

December 16, 2013
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FRB St. Louis is Far Ahead of the Data Pack

The email below arrived recently from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. It reminds me of something that's hardly a secret, but that nevertheless merits applause, namely that FRBSL's Research Department is a wonderful source of economic and fi...

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Death of a statistician from Surbiton

December 16, 2013
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This morning I heard from Christian the news that Dennis Lindley has passed away, last Saturday. He was 90. I think I'd already linked to this video in a different post, but I'm re-linking it right now.

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How to coerce SAS/IML vectors to matrices

December 16, 2013
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How to coerce SAS/IML vectors to matrices

Recently a SAS/IML programmer asked a question regarding how to perform matrix arithmetic when some of the data are in vectors and other are in matrices. The programmer wanted to add the following matrices: The problem was that the numbers in the first two matrices were stored in vectors. The [...]

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Scaling An Axis to Make A Point

December 16, 2013
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Scaling An Axis to Make A Point

A clever chart redesign last week got a lot of people talking about which one is “right.” What is more interesting to me is not which one is (supposedly) the better representation of the truth, but which purpose each one serves. The original chart is the following, which shows the number of female CEOs in […]

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (12/15/13)

December 16, 2013
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Rafa (in Spanish) clarifying some of the problems with the anti-GMO crowd. Joe Bliztstein, most recently of #futureofstats fame, talks up data science in the Harvard Crimson (via Rafa). As has been pointed out by Rebecca Nugent when she stopped … Continue reading →

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Deterministic and Probabilistic models and thinking

December 16, 2013
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Deterministic and Probabilistic models and thinking

The way we understand and make sense of variation in the world affects decisions we make. Part of understanding variation is understanding the difference between deterministic and probabilistic (stochastic) models. The NZ curriculum specifies the following learning outcome: “Selects and … Continue reading →

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Deterministic and Probabilistic models and thinking

December 16, 2013
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Deterministic and Probabilistic models and thinking

The way we understand and make sense of variation in the world affects decisions we make. Part of understanding variation is understanding the difference between deterministic and probabilistic (stochastic) models. The NZ curriculum specifies the following learning outcome: “Selects and … Continue reading →

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The Complexities of Customer Segmentation: Removing Response Intensity to Reveal Response Pattern

December 15, 2013
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The Complexities of Customer Segmentation: Removing Response Intensity to Reveal Response Pattern

At the end of the last post, the reader was left assuming respondent homogeneity without any means for discovering if all of our customers adopted the same feature prioritization. To review, nine features were presented one at a time, and each time res...

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Surprising Facts about Surprising Facts

December 15, 2013
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Surprising Facts about Surprising Facts

A paper of mine on “double-counting” and novel evidence just came out: ”Some surprising facts about (the problem of) surprising facts” in Studies in History and Philosophy of Science (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.shpsa.2013.10.005 ABSTRACT: A common intuition about evidence is that if data x have been used to construct a hypothesis H, then x should not be used again in […]

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The UN Plot to Force Bayesianism on Unsuspecting Americans (penalized B-Spline edition)

December 15, 2013
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The UN Plot to Force Bayesianism on Unsuspecting Americans (penalized B-Spline edition)

Mike Spagat sent me an email with the above heading, referring to this paper by Leontine Alkema and Jin Rou New, which begins: National estimates of the under-5 mortality rate (U5MR) are used to track progress in reducing child mortality and to evaluate countries’ performance related to United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4, which calls […]The post The UN Plot to Force Bayesianism on Unsuspecting Americans (penalized B-Spline edition) appeared…

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plotting y and log(y) in one figure

December 15, 2013
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plotting y and log(y) in one figure

Sometimes I have the desire to plot both on the linear and on the log scale. To save space just two figures is not my solution. I want to reuse the x-axis, legend, title. This post examines possibilities to do so with standard plot tools, lattice and g...

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Trapezoidal Integration – Conceptual Foundations and a Statistical Application in R

Trapezoidal Integration – Conceptual Foundations and a Statistical Application in R

Introduction Today, I will begin a series of posts on numerical integration, which has a wide range of applications in many fields, including statistics.  I will introduce trapezoidal integration by discussing its conceptual foundations, write my own R function to implement trapezoidal integration, and use it to check that the Beta(2, 5) probability density function […]

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Visualization of 2012 Crime Rates of Different States in the US using rCharts

December 15, 2013
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UPDATE: THE BLOG/SITE HAS MOVED TO GITHUB. THE NEW LINK FOR THE BLOG/SITE IS patilv.github.io and THE LINK TO THIS POST IS: http://bit.ly/1pi6mGo. PLEASE UPDATE ANY BOOKMARKS YOU MAY HAVE.In this post, I look at crime rates (per 100,000 people) in 2012...

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Oswald evidence

December 14, 2013
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Aaron Edlin writes: This story is interesting in its own right . . . I have a question so I thought I would ask a Bayesian statistician. One fact I learned on reading this article is that Oswald had a job in the building that Kennedy drove by before Kennedy’s route was chosen. So Oswald […]The post Oswald evidence appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Le Monde puzzle [#843]

December 13, 2013
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Le Monde puzzle [#843]

A straightforward Le Monde mathematical puzzle: Find integers x with 4 to 8 digits which are (a) perfect squares x=y² such that [x/100] is also a perfect square; (b) perfect cubes x=y³ such that [x/1000] is also a perfect cube; (c) perfect cubes x=y³ such that [x/100] is also a perfect cube (where [y] denotes […]

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Financial Data Accessible from R – part IV

December 13, 2013
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DataMarket is the latest data source of financial data accessible from R I came across. A good tutorial can be found here. I updated the table and the descriptions below. Source R Package Free Access Available on CRAN Provider url Yahoo, FRED, Oanda, Google Quantmod Yes Yes Quantmod Quandl Quandl Yes Yes Quandl TrueFX TFX […]

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And now, here’s something that would make Ed Tufte spin in his . . . ummm, Tufte’s still around, actually, so let’s just say I don’t think he’d like it!

December 13, 2013
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And now, here’s something that would make Ed Tufte spin in his . . . ummm, Tufte’s still around, actually, so let’s just say I don’t think he’d like it!

We haven’t had one of these in awhile, having mostly switched to the “chess trivia” and “bad p-values” genres of blogging . . . But I had to come back to the topic after receiving this note from Raghuveer Parthasarathy: Here’s another bad graph you might like. It might (arguably) be even worse than the […]The post And now, here’s something that would make Ed Tufte spin in his .…

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Bayes is the Foundation of Reproducible Science

December 13, 2013
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While working on the definition of probability post, I saw Gelman’s advertisement subtitled “Can we use Bayesian methods to resolve the current crisis of unreplicable research?” No doubt Gelman has reasonable and constructive points t...

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Simply Statistics Interview with Michael Eisen, Co-Founder of the Public Library of Science (Part 2/2)

December 13, 2013
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Here is Part 2 of our Jeff's and my interview with Michael Eisen, Co-Founder of the Public Library of Science.

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Flexibility is good

December 13, 2013
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Flexibility is good

If I made a separate post for each interesting blog discussion, we’d get overwhelmed. That’s why I often leave detailed responses in the comments section, even though I’m pretty sure that most readers don’t look in the comments at all. Sometimes, though, I think it’s good to bring such discussions to light. Here’s a recent […]The post Flexibility is good appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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sudoku break

December 12, 2013
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sudoku break

While in Warwick last week, one evening after having exhausted my laptop battery, I tried the following Sudoku (from Libération): and could not even start. As it happened, this was a setting with no deterministic move, i.e. all free/empty entries had multiple possible values. So after trying for a while and following trees to no […]

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The key word in "Data Science" is not Data, it is Science

December 12, 2013
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One of my colleagues was just at a conference where they saw a presentation about using data to solve a problem where data had previously not been abundant. The speaker claimed the data were "big data" and a question from … Continue reading →

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Simply Statistics Interview with Michael Eisen, Co-Founder of the Public Library of Science (Part 1/2)

December 12, 2013
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Jeff and I had a chance to interview Michael Eisen, a co-founder of the Public Library of Science, HHMI Investigator, and a Professor at UC Berkeley. We talked with him about publishing in open access and how young investigators might publish … Continue reading →

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