PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street

January 5, 2016
By
PACE study and the Lancet:  Journal reputation is a two-way street

One thing that struck me about this PACE scandal: if this study was so bad as all that, how did it taken so seriously by policymakers and the press? There’s been a lot of discussion about serious flaws in the published papers, and even more discussion about the unforgivable refusal of the research team to […] The post PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street appeared…

Read more »

Regression with Splines: Should we care about Non-Significant Components?

January 4, 2016
By
Regression with Splines: Should we care about Non-Significant Components?

Following the course of this morning, I got a very interesting question from a student of mine. The question was about having non-significant components in a splineregression.  Should we consider a model with a small number of knots and all components significant, or one with a (much) larger number of knots, and a lot of knots non-significant? My initial intuition was to prefer the second alternative, like in autoregressive models in R. When…

Read more »

The guide

January 4, 2016
By
The guide

Before and over the Christmas break, Christina and I have done some more work on our bmeta package, which I've already mentioned in another post, here $-$ well, to be fair, Christina has done most of the work; I was being annoying suggesting chang...

Read more »

Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths

January 4, 2016
By

I’ll start off this blog on the first work day of the new year with an important post connecting some ideas we’ve been lately talking a lot about. Someone rolls a die four times, and he tells you he got the numbers 1, 4, 3, 6. Is this a plausible outcome? Sure. Is is probable? […] The post Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths appeared…

Read more »

On deck this week

January 4, 2016
By

Mon: Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths Tues: PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street Wed: The PACE trial and the problems with discrete, yes/no thinking Thurs: Givewell wants to put lithium in your drinking water Fri: Read this to change your entire perspective on statistics: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Happy new year. Did you have a white Christmas?

January 4, 2016
By
Happy new year. Did you have a white Christmas?

Happy 2016. I spent time with the family in California, wiping out any chance of a white Christmas, although I hear that the probability would have been miniscule even had I stayed. I did come across a graphic that tried...

Read more »

Popular posts from The DO Loop in 2015

January 4, 2016
By
Popular posts from The DO Loop in 2015

I wrote 114 posts for The DO Loop blog in 2015. Which were the most popular with readers? In general, highly technical articles appeal to only a small group of readers, whereas less technical articles appeal to a larger audience. Consequently, many of my popular articles were related to data […] The post Popular posts from The DO Loop in 2015 appeared first on The DO Loop.

Read more »

Monty Got a Raw Hand

January 4, 2016
By
Monty Got a Raw Hand

Now nonsense isn’t new to me . . . check out this new paper by Josh Miller and Adam Sanjurjo. The post Monty Got a Raw Hand appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

You won’t believe this story: Tamiflu conflict of interest

January 3, 2016
By
You won’t believe this story:  Tamiflu conflict of interest

Paul Alper writes: Maybe it is time to return to really important things such as medical swindles in particular, Tamiflu. Consider Tamifu and its financially-influenced and influential supportors as seen from the fabulous Susan Perry of Minnpost: The group of researchers who conducted the Lancet study [supporting Tamiflu]was described in a commentary that accompanied their […] The post You won’t believe this story: Tamiflu conflict of interest appeared first on…

Read more »

You won’t believe this story: Tamiflu conflict of interest

January 3, 2016
By
You won’t believe this story:  Tamiflu conflict of interest

Paul Alper writes: Maybe it is time to return to really important things such as medical swindles in particular, Tamiflu. Consider Tamifu and its financially-influenced and influential supportors as seen from the fabulous Susan Perry of Minnpost: The group of researchers who conducted the Lancet study [supporting Tamiflu]was described in a commentary that accompanied their […] The post You won’t believe this story: Tamiflu conflict of interest appeared first on…

Read more »

A plot of ‘Who works at home’

January 3, 2016
By
A plot of ‘Who works at home’

I ran across this post containing displays on who works from home. I must say it looks great and is interactive but it did not help me understand the data. So I created this post to display the same data with a boring plot which might help me. For...

Read more »

Endogeneity-Robust OLS Estimation (?)

January 2, 2016
By

Imagine White-style robust OLS inference, but with robustness to endogeneity as opposed to heteroskedasticity/autocorrelation (or maybe even robustness to all three).  It sounds too good to be true.  Actually, it sounds impossible, and even i...

Read more »

“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

January 2, 2016
By
“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

Nadia Hassan writes: Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs. This [from Javier Zarracina] is not a stand-out on that front, but it is far from ideal: A lot of buzz in recent years about data journalism or quantitative journalism. There is a lot of issues to be […] The post “Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you…

Read more »

Blog about Stats 2015 in review

January 1, 2016
By
Blog about Stats 2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 14,000 times in 2015. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 5 sold-out performances for that many … Continue reading Blog about Stats 2015 in review

Read more »

Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis, despite lack of evidence”

January 1, 2016
By

Paul Alper points us to this scary news article by Susan Perry: Calcium and vitamin D supplements have been shown repeatedly to have no beneficial effect on preventing or treating osteoporosis . . . In fact, the evidence has not only demonstrated that calcium and vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of bone […] The post Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and…

Read more »

“Why researchers keep citing retracted papers”

January 1, 2016
By

Lucas Estevam points us to this interesting article by Keith Collins. The post “Why researchers keep citing retracted papers” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

Midnight With Birnbaum (Happy New Year)

December 31, 2015
By
Midnight With Birnbaum (Happy New Year)

 Just as in the past 4 years since I’ve been blogging, I revisit that spot in the road at 11p.m., just outside the Elbar Room, get into a strange-looking taxi, and head to “Midnight With Birnbaum”. (The pic on the left is the only blurry image I have of the club I’m taken to.) I wonder […]

Read more »

(A pointer to) bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

December 31, 2015
By
(A pointer to) bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

Screen shot from bayes.js blog post.This is just a pointer to a new post at Rasmus Bååth's Blog that might interest readers of DBDA2E. bayes.js: A small JavaScript library that implements an adaptive MCMC sampler and a couple of probability distribut...

Read more »

Top posts of 2015

December 31, 2015
By

Here they are: What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied to statistics education Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing from foreign students What to do in […] The post Top posts of 2015 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Happy New Year

December 31, 2015
By
Happy New Year

Socks are more than you might think. The proof is in Netflix Socks for Statistics And the next step could be: Waking up all users of statistics if they fall asleep and miss the essential data for decision making. Happy socks and a Happy new Year to yo...

Read more »

bayes.js: A Small Library for Doing MCMC in the Browser

December 30, 2015
By

Bayesian data analysis is cool, Markov chain Monte Carlo is the cool technique that makes Bayesian data analysis possible, and wouldn’t it be coolness if you could do all of this in the browser? That was what I thought, at least, and I’ve now made bayes.js: A small JavaScript library that implements an adaptive MCMC sampler and a couple of probability distributions, and that makes it relatively easy to implement…

Read more »

Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV

December 30, 2015
By
Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV

Paul Alper points us to this in-depth article by Steven Brill on the topic of Alex Gorsky, the pharma executive who notoriously marketed a dangerous drug and hid the evidence of its dangers. The headline was a bit of a cheat, though. The story is fascinating from a statistical perspective but it has no chess […] The post Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

The Econometric Game, 2016

December 30, 2015
By
The Econometric Game, 2016

I like to think of The Econometric Game as the World Championship of Econometrics.There have been 16 annual Econometric Games to date, and some of these have been featured previously in this blog. For instance in 2015 there were several posts, such as ...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe