Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

August 21, 2015
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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

I graduated from MSU this summer and moved to Indianapolis as an assistant professor of Statistics at IUPUI. This is my first official job in life. Welcome to my Homepage: math.iupui.edu/~hlwang !

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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

August 21, 2015
By
Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

I graduated from MSU this summer and moved to Indianapolis as an assistant professor of Statistics at IUPUI. This is my first official job in life. Welcome to my Homepage: math.iupui.edu/~hlwang !

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Aahhhhh, young people!

August 21, 2015
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Amusingly statistically illiterate headline from Slate: “Apple Notices That Basically Half the Population Menstruates.” Ummmm, let’s do a quick calculation: 50 – 12 = 38. If you assume the average woman lives to be 80, then the proportion of the population who is menstruating is approximately .52*38/80 = .247. 25% is hardly “basically half”! But […] The post Aahhhhh, young people! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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She wants to be an airborne ranger

August 21, 2015
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She wants to be an airborne ranger

I wanna be an airborne ranger, Live the life of guts and danger.* If you are an 80's movie buff, you might remember the scene in The Breakfast Club where Bender, the juvenile delinquent played by Judd Nelson, distracts the principal by running through the school singing this song. Recently, […] The post She wants to be an airborne ranger appeared first on The DO Loop.

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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

August 21, 2015
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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

A classic fallacy of rejection is taking a statistically significant result as evidence of a discrepancy from a test (or null) hypothesis larger than is warranted. Standard tests do have resources to combat this fallacy, but you won’t see them in textbook formulations. It’s not new statistical method, but new (and correct) interpretations of existing methods, that are needed. One […]

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If you ask different questions you get different answers – one more way science isn’t broken it is just really hard

August 20, 2015
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If you ask different questions you get different answers – one more way science isn’t broken it is just really hard

If you haven't already read the amazing piece by Christie Aschwanden on why Science isn't Broken you should do so immediately. It does an amazing job of capturing the nuance of statistics as applied to real data sets and how that can be misconstrued as science being "broken" without falling for the easy "everything is wrong"

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Econometric Society World Congress

August 20, 2015
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Econometric Society World Congress

The Econometric Society holds a World Congress every five years. Right now, the 2015 Congress is taking place in Montréal, Canada.Here's the full program. Enjoy!© 2015, David E. Giles

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Data-analysis assignments for BDA class?

August 20, 2015
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In my Bayesian data analysis class this fall, I’m planning on doing some lecturing and class discussion, but the core of the course will be weekly data-analysis assignments where they do applied statistics using Stan (to fit models) and R (to pre-process the data and post-process the inferences). So, I need a bunch of examples. […] The post Data-analysis assignments for BDA class? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Dumbing by numbers

August 20, 2015
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The New York Times has been making waves this week featuring management practices at Amazon and workplace tracking practices at various companies (link). These are essential references for how data make us dumber. I am going to ignore the shocking claim by the journalist who stated that GE is "long a standard-setter in management practices." To give him some credit, he did not say "good" management practice. It is true…

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Job @ UCL

August 20, 2015
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Here is the link for a new post recently advertised at UCL. The job is in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, but I think the idea is to try and bridge some strong and durable connections with our group. I have done some joint w...

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Aren’t you on holiday?

August 20, 2015
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Aren’t you on holiday?

I've been very silent throughout the month of August $-$ no single post, so far. The main reason for that is that we've moved home (although not very far from where we were), which has meant lots of fun...Highlights of this recent period include: 1) a ...

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Kickin’ it with elastic net regression

August 20, 2015
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Kickin’ it with elastic net regression

With the kind of data that I usually work with, overfitting regression models can be a huge problem if I'm not careful. Ridge regression is a really effective technique for thwarting overfitting. It does this by penalizing the L2 norm… Continue reading →

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Statistics, the Spooky Science

August 19, 2015
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Statistics, the Spooky Science

I was reading this interview Of Erich Lehmann yesterday: “A Conversation with Erich L. Lehmann” Lehmann: …I read over and over again that hypothesis testing is dead as a door nail, that nobody does hypothesis testing. I talk to Julie and she says that in the behaviorial sciences, hypothesis testing is what they do the […]

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P > 0.05? I can make any p-value statistically significant with adaptive FDR procedures

August 19, 2015
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P > 0.05? I can make any p-value statistically significant with adaptive FDR procedures

Everyone knows now that you have to correct for multiple testing when you calculate many p-values otherwise this can happen:   One of the most popular ways to correct for multiple testing is to estimate or control the false discovery rate. The false discovery rate attempts to quantify the fraction of made discoveries that are

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“Soylent 1.5” < black beans and yoghurt

August 19, 2015
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“Soylent 1.5” < black beans and yoghurt

Mark Palko quotes Justin Fox: On Monday, software engineer Rob Rhinehart published an account of his new life without alternating electrical current — which he has undertaken because generating that current “produces 32 percent of all greenhouse gases, more than any other economic sector.” Connection to the power grid isn’t all Rhinehart has given up. […] The post “Soylent 1.5” < black beans and yoghurt appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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When in Seattle, don’t look for the bus map

August 19, 2015
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When in Seattle, don’t look for the bus map

The past week in Seattle, I was blessed with amazing weather. The city has great coffee and restaurants, so pleased me alright. But Seattle-ites, please tell your government to burn your transit map presto! I tried looking at the map...

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Bar Charts, Error Bars and R

August 19, 2015
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A recent post on R Bloggers, linked to an article on DataScience+ that details how to use R to plot error bars on bar charts to indicate the variability in a particular variable. There are many other articles that detail this type of chart, sometimes ...

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Correlations between groups of variables

August 19, 2015
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Correlations between groups of variables

Typically a correlation analysis reports the correlations between all pairs of variables, including the variables with themselves. The resulting correlation matrix is square, symmetric, and has 1s on the main diagonal. But suppose you are interested in only specific combinations of variables. Perhaps you want the pairwise correlations between one […] The post Correlations between groups of variables appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Daniel on Stan at the NYC Machine Learning Meetup

August 19, 2015
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Daniel on Stan at the NYC Machine Learning Meetup

I (Daniel) will be giving a Stan overview talk on Thursday, August 20, 7 pm. Bob gave a talk there 3.5 years ago. My talk will be light and include where we’ve been and where we’re going.   P.S. If you make it, find me. I have Stan stickers to give out. P.P.S. Stan is […] The post Daniel on Stan at the NYC Machine Learning Meetup appeared first on…

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Display of Geographic Data in R

August 18, 2015
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This was a deck used in my presentation to the Inland Northwest R user Group this past Friday (August 14, 2015). It relies on the work done by many folks, including Ari Lamstein, Kyle Walker, Erik Erhardt, and the kind folks at R-Studio. Please click o...

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The Inspection Paradox is Everywhere

August 18, 2015
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The Inspection Paradox is Everywhere

The following is a draft of an article I have submitted for publication in CHANCE Magazine, a publication of the American Statistical Association. With their encouragement, I am publishing it here to solicit comments from readers (and possibly correct...

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Macartan Humphreys on the Worm Wars

August 18, 2015
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Macartan Humphreys on the Worm Wars

My Columbia political science colleague shares “What Has Been Learned from the Deworming Replications: A Nonpartisan View”: Last month there was another battle in a dispute between economists and epidemiologists over the merits of mass deworming.1 In brief, economists claim there is clear evidence that cheap deworming interventions have large effects on welfare via increased […] The post Macartan Humphreys on the Worm Wars appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Visualising theoretical distributions of GLMs

August 18, 2015
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Visualising theoretical distributions of GLMs

Two weeks ago I discussed various linear and generalised linear models in R using ice cream sales statistics. The data showed not surprisingly that more ice cream was sold at higher temperatures.icecream

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