“With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to the public, and the public can trust the work.”

May 30, 2015
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Dan Wright writes: Given your healthy skepticism of findings/conclusions from post-peer-reviewed papers, I thought I would forward the following from Institute of Educational Sciences. Here is a sample quote: Simply put, peer review is a method by which scientists who are experts in a particular field examine another scientist’s work to verify that it makes […] The post “With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to…

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Three Reasons to Prefer GDPplus to Simple GDP Averages

May 29, 2015
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Let's start with some notation. GDPe is expenditure-side GDP from BEA. GDPi is income-side GDP from BEA. GDPavg is the average of GDPe and GDPi recently introduced by BEA. GDPplus is the Kalman-smoother extraction of GDP from GDPe and GDPi, produced an...

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OK, I’ll Continue With Google Blogger

May 29, 2015
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First, apologies for the posts about my Google Blogger situation. I fear that they border on spam, but at the same time I need to communicate the situation.Anyway, wow, what a flow of communications regarding the last post, from more routes and with mo...

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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

May 29, 2015
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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

Several people pointed me to this awesome story by John Bohannon: “Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just […] The post John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value…

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Data Journalism avant la lettre

May 29, 2015
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Data Journalism avant la lettre

From Data to Insight Where there are data, there is insight. However, insight needs know how – know how about …Continue reading →

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Cutting Ties With Google Blogger

May 28, 2015
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The nonsense reported in my May 23 post actually goes well beyond what I reported, to the point where I've lost patience.  (I'm sure I'll eventually blog further on it.)  So henceforth I plan to disintermediate Google, instead hosting the No ...

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The Replication Network

May 28, 2015
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The Replication Network

Some of my previous posts have dealt with the issue of replicability - e.g., here and here.I had an email from Bob Reed today, alerting me to his involvement in the launching of The Replication Network. I knew that this was a b...

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Science is a calling and a career, here is a career planning guide for students and postdocs

May 28, 2015
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Editor’s note: This post was inspired by a really awesome career planning guide that Ben Langmead wrote up for his postdocs which you should go check out right now. You can also find the slightly adapted Leek group career planning guide here. The most common reason that people go into science is altruistic. They loved

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Cracked.com > Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, New York Times

May 28, 2015
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David Christopher Bell goes to the trouble (link from Palko) to explain why “Every Map of ‘The Most Popular _________ by State’ Is Bullshit.” As long as enterprising P.R. firms are willing to supply unsourced data, lazy journalists (or whatever you call these people) will promote it. We saw this a few years ago in […] The post Cracked.com > Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, New York Times appeared first…

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Beta unblockers

May 28, 2015
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Beta unblockers

A couple of weeks ago, we've uploaded the new version of BCEA on CRAN, to include the function implementing our method for the computation of the EVPPI based on INLA-SPDE $-$ I've also already mentioned this here.While this is a stable versio...

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Five reasons to use ODS EXCLUDE to suppress SAS output

May 28, 2015
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Five reasons to use ODS EXCLUDE to suppress SAS output

I previously wrote about the best way to suppress output from SAS procedures. Suppressing output is necessary in simulation and bootstrap analyses, and it is useful in other contexts as well. In my previous article, I wrote, "many programmers use ODS _ALL_ CLOSE as a way to suppress output, but […] The post Five reasons to use ODS EXCLUDE to suppress SAS output appeared first on The DO Loop.

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“Intentions” is the new code word for “error probabilities”: Allan Birnbaum’s Birthday

May 27, 2015
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“Intentions” is the new code word for “error probabilities”: Allan Birnbaum’s Birthday

Today is Allan Birnbaum’s Birthday. Birnbaum’s (1962) classic “On the Foundations of Statistical Inference,” in Breakthroughs in Statistics (volume I 1993), concerns a principle that remains at the heart of today’s controversies in statistics–even if it isn’t obvious at first: the Likelihood Principle (LP) (also called the strong likelihood Principle SLP, to distinguish it from the […]

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R #1 by Wide Margin in Latest KDnuggets Poll

May 27, 2015
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R #1 by Wide Margin in Latest KDnuggets Poll

The results of the latest KDnuggets Poll on software for Analytics, Big Data and Data Mining are out, and R has moved into the #1 position by a wide margin. I’ve updated the Surveys of Use section of The Popularity of Data … Continue reading →

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What’s the worst joke you’ve ever heard?

May 27, 2015
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When I say worst, I mean worst. A joke with no redeeming qualities. Here’s my contender, from the book “1000 Knock-Knock Jokes for Kids”: – Knock Knock. – Who’s there? – Ann – Ann who? – An apple fell on my head. There’s something beautiful about this one. It’s the clerihew of jokes. Zero cleverness. […] The post What’s the worst joke you’ve ever heard? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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the Flatland paradox [#2]

May 26, 2015
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the Flatland paradox [#2]

Another trip in the métro today (to work with Pierre Jacob and Lawrence Murray in a Paris Anticafé!, as the University was closed) led me to infer—warning!, this is not the exact distribution!—the distribution of x, namely since a path x of length l(x) will corresponds to N draws if N-l(x) is an even integer […]

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Respecting Real-World Decision Making and Rejecting Models That Do Not: No MaxDiff or Best-Worst Scaling

May 26, 2015
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Respecting Real-World Decision Making and Rejecting Models That Do Not: No MaxDiff or Best-Worst Scaling

Utility has been reified, and we have committed the fallacy of misplaced concreteness.As this link illustrates, Sawtooth's MaxDiff provides an instructive example of reification in marketing research. What is the contribution of "clean bathrooms" ...

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Call for papers: Bayesian statistics, at Zeitschrift für Psychologie

May 26, 2015
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I am guest editing a special topical issue of Zeitschrift für Psychologie on Bayesian statistics. The complete call, with details, can be found here: [pdf]. Briefly:As Bayesian statistics become part of standard analysis in psychology, the Zeitschrift...

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Stock, flow, and two smoking regressions

May 26, 2015
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Stock, flow, and two smoking regressions

In a comment on our recent discussion of stock and flow, Tom Fiddaman writes: Here’s an egregious example of statistical stock-flow confusion that got published. Fiddaman is pointing to a post of his from 2011 discussing a paper that “examines the relationship between CO2 concentration and flooding in the US, and finds no significant impact.” […] The post Stock, flow, and two smoking regressions appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Some statistics about nutrition statistics

May 26, 2015
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I only read nutrition studies in the service of this blog but otherwise, I don't trust them or care. Nevertheless, the health beat of most media outlets is obsessed with printing the latest research on coffee or eggs or fats or alcohol or what have you. Now, the estimable John Ioannidis has published an editorial in BMJ titled "Implausible Results in Human Nutrition Research". John previously told us about the…

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New GDP Series From BEA

May 26, 2015
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New GDP Series From BEA

BEA's "new product" (see below) -- a U.S. GDP estimate that's a simple average of expenditure- and income-side GDP estimates -- is not yet at the cutting-edge of historical GDP estimation.On the benefits of blending the expenditure- and incom...

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What is the best way to suppress ODS output in SAS?

May 26, 2015
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What is the best way to suppress ODS output in SAS?

SAS procedures can produce a lot of output, but you don't always want to see it all. In simulation and bootstrap studies, you might analyze 10,000 samples or resamples. Usually you are not interested in seeing the results of each analysis displayed on your computer screen. Instead, you want to […] The post What is the best way to suppress ODS output in SAS? appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Communicating Risk at the Bay Area R User Group

May 26, 2015
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Communicating Risk at the Bay Area R User Group

I will be speaking at the Bay Area User Group meeting tonight about Communicating Risk. Anthony Goldbloom from Kaggle and Karim Chine from ElasticR will be there as well. The meeting will be at Microsoft in Mountain View.Later this week I will give a s...

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Paper: An Evaluation of the Impact of Visual Embellishments in Bar Charts

May 26, 2015
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Paper: An Evaluation of the Impact of Visual Embellishments in Bar Charts

Information graphics often use variations and embellishments of standard charts that may distort the way people read the data. But how bad are these distortions really? In a paper to be presented at EuroVis this week, Drew Skau, Lane Harrison, and I tested their effects in an experiment. Based on a survey of common infographics … Continue reading Paper: An Evaluation of the Impact of Visual Embellishments in Bar Charts

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