Difference-in-Differences With Missing Data

January 9, 2016
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Difference-in-Differences With Missing Data

This brief post is a "shout out" for  Irene Botusaru (Economics, Simon Fraser University) who gave a great seminar in our department yesterday.The paper that she presented (co-authored with Federico Guitierrez), is titled "Diff...

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Why are trolls so bothersome?

January 9, 2016
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Why are trolls so bothersome?

We don’t get a lot of trolls on this blog. When people try, I typically respond with some mixture of directness and firmness, and the trolls either give up or perhaps they recognize that I am answering questions in sincerity, which does not serve their trollish purposes. But I’m pretty sure that my feeling is […] The post Why are trolls so bothersome? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

January 9, 2016
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Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

In my last post about standardized effect sizes, I showed how averaging across trials before computing standardized effect sizes such as partial \(\eta^2\) and Cohen's d can produce arbitrary estimates of those quantities. This has drastic implications...

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A Data Science Solution to the Question "What is Data Science?"

January 8, 2016
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A Data Science Solution to the Question "What is Data Science?"

As this flowchart from Wikipedia illustrates, data science is about collecting, cleaning, analyzing and reporting data. But is it data science or just or a "sexed up term" for Statistics (see embedded quote by Nate Silver)? It's difficult to separ...

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Preregistration Challenge: My email exchange

January 8, 2016
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Preregistration Challenge: My email exchange

David Mellor, from the Center for Open Science, emailed me asking if I’d announce his Preregistration Challenge on my blog, and I’m glad to do so. You win $1,000 if your properly preregistered paper is published. The recent replication effort in psychology showed, despite the common refrain – “it’s too easy to get low P-values” – that in […]

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Know your data 17: when other people can track your Uber location

January 8, 2016
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The news is out that Uber got fined by the New York Attorney General's office for data breaches and privacy concerns. The headline writer for ZDNet nailed this one: "Uber fined peanuts in God View surveillance" (link). And the sub-lead has the kicker: "For a company with a valuation of over $50 billion, a $20,000 fine over user data protection is laughable." This settlement tells us one of the following…

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Repel overlapping text labels in ggplot2

January 8, 2016
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Repel overlapping text labels in ggplot2

A while back I showed you how to make volcano plots in base R for visualizing gene expression results. This is just one of many genome-scale plots where you might want to show all individual results but highlight or call out important results by labeli...

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Read this to change your entire perspective on statistics: Why inversion of hypothesis tests is not a general procedure for creating uncertainty intervals

January 8, 2016
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Read this to change your entire perspective on statistics:  Why inversion of hypothesis tests is not a general procedure for creating uncertainty intervals

Dave Choi writes: A reviewer has pointed me something that you wrote in your blog on inverting test statistics. Specifically, the reviewer is interested in what can happen if the test can reject the entire assumed family of models, and has asked me to consider discussing whether it applies to a paper that I am […] The post Read this to change your entire perspective on statistics: Why inversion of…

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Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

January 7, 2016
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Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

Recently, there have been many calls for a focus on effect sizes in psychological research. In this post, I discuss how naively using standardized effect sizes with averaged data can be misleading. This is particularly problematic for meta-analysis, where differences in number of trials across studies could lead to very misleading results.There are two main types of effect sizes in typical use: raw effect sizes and standardized effect sizes. Raw…

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Paper: Presentation-Oriented Visualization Techniques

January 7, 2016
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Paper: Presentation-Oriented Visualization Techniques

Presentation is often considered a part of visualization, but what does that mean for the kinds of techniques we use? Are they the same as used for analysis? What criteria should we use to pick them? In a new paper, I discuss a class of techniques I call presentation-only. The paper is accordingly titled Presentation-Only Visualization Techniques, and it just … Continue reading Paper: Presentation-Oriented Visualization Techniques

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Big p, Little n

January 7, 2016
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Big p, Little n

Statisticians use n to denote the number of subjects in a data set and p to denote nearly everything else. You’re supposed to know from context what each p means. In the phrase “big n, little p” the symbol p means the number of measurements per subject. Traditional data sets are “big n, little p” […]

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Givewell wants to put lithium in your drinking water

January 7, 2016
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Givewell wants to put lithium in your drinking water

Actually, they just want to look into the possibility. Alexander Berger of Givewell writes: In the past you’ve written a couple posts about GiveWell’s research, and we’ve recently posted something else that I thought might be of interest to your audience: an expression of interest in research on the impact of trace lithium on suicide […] The post Givewell wants to put lithium in your drinking water appeared first on…

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MCMskv #2 [ridge with a view]

January 6, 2016
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MCMskv #2 [ridge with a view]

Tuesday at MCMSkv was a rather tense day for me, from having to plan the whole day “away from home” [8km away] to the mundane worry of renting ski equipment and getting to the ski runs over the noon break, to giving a poster over our new mixture paper with Kaniav Kamary and Kate Lee, […]

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The PACE trial and the problems with discrete, yes/no thinking

January 6, 2016
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The PACE trial and the problems with discrete, yes/no thinking

I don’t often read the Iranian Journal of Cancer Prevention, but I like this quote: I was thinking more about the PACE trial. God is in every leaf of every tree. There’s been a lot of discussion about statistical problems with the PACE papers, and also about the research team’s depressing refusal to share their […] The post The PACE trial and the problems with discrete, yes/no thinking appeared first…

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R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

January 6, 2016
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R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

We're pleased to announce that a special issue of the American Statistician on "Statistics and the Undergraduate Curriculum" (November, 2015) is available at http://amstat.tandfonline.com/toc/utas20/69/4. Johanna Hardin (Pomona College) and Nick were...

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Compute a weighted mean in SAS

January 6, 2016
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Compute a weighted mean in SAS

Weighted averages are all around us. Teachers use weighted averages to assign a test more weight than a quiz. Schools use weighted averages to compute grade-point averages. Financial companies compute the return on a portfolio as a weighted average of the component assets. Financial charts show (linearly) weighted moving averages […] The post Compute a weighted mean in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Baltimore Orioles Hackathon coming soon!

January 6, 2016
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Baltimore Orioles Hackathon coming soon!

Kevin Tenenbaum writes: I wanted to let you know about a hackathon that we will be hosting at Camden Yards on February 5th, 2016. This event is a great opportunity for your students to use their statistics, data science and computer science expertise to find novel solutions to problems that Major League Baseball teams deal […] The post Baltimore Orioles Hackathon coming soon! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street

January 5, 2016
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PACE study and the Lancet:  Journal reputation is a two-way street

One thing that struck me about this PACE scandal: if this study was so bad as all that, how did it taken so seriously by policymakers and the press? There’s been a lot of discussion about serious flaws in the published papers, and even more discussion about the unforgivable refusal of the research team to […] The post PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street appeared…

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Regression with Splines: Should we care about Non-Significant Components?

January 4, 2016
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Regression with Splines: Should we care about Non-Significant Components?

Following the course of this morning, I got a very interesting question from a student of mine. The question was about having non-significant components in a splineregression.  Should we consider a model with a small number of knots and all components significant, or one with a (much) larger number of knots, and a lot of knots non-significant? My initial intuition was to prefer the second alternative, like in autoregressive models in R. When…

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The guide

January 4, 2016
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The guide

Before and over the Christmas break, Christina and I have done some more work on our bmeta package, which I've already mentioned in another post, here $-$ well, to be fair, Christina has done most of the work; I was being annoying suggesting chang...

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Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths

January 4, 2016
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I’ll start off this blog on the first work day of the new year with an important post connecting some ideas we’ve been lately talking a lot about. Someone rolls a die four times, and he tells you he got the numbers 1, 4, 3, 6. Is this a plausible outcome? Sure. Is is probable? […] The post Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths appeared…

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On deck this week

January 4, 2016
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Mon: Plausibility vs. probability, prior distributions, and the garden of forking paths Tues: PACE study and the Lancet: Journal reputation is a two-way street Wed: The PACE trial and the problems with discrete, yes/no thinking Thurs: Givewell wants to put lithium in your drinking water Fri: Read this to change your entire perspective on statistics: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Happy new year. Did you have a white Christmas?

January 4, 2016
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Happy new year. Did you have a white Christmas?

Happy 2016. I spent time with the family in California, wiping out any chance of a white Christmas, although I hear that the probability would have been miniscule even had I stayed. I did come across a graphic that tried...

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