Category: Zombies

Jeremy Freese was ahead of the curve

Here’s sociologist Jeremy Freese writing, back in 2008: Key findings in quantitative social science are often interaction effects in which the estimated “effect” of a continuous variable on an outcome for one group is found to differ from the estimated effect for another group. An example I use when teaching is that the relationship between […]

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Jeremy Freese was ahead of the curve

Here’s sociologist Jeremy Freese writing, back in 2008: Key findings in quantitative social science are often interaction effects in which the estimated “effect” of a continuous variable on an outcome for one group is found to differ from the estimated effect for another group. An example I use when teaching is that the relationship between […]

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Amelia, it was just a false alarm

Nah, jet fuel can’t melt steel beams. I’ve watched enough conspiracy documentaries – Camp Cope Some ideas persist long after the mounting evidence against them becomes overwhelming. Some of these things are kooky but probably harmless (try as I might, I do not care about ESP etc), whereas some are deeply damaging (I’m looking at you “vaccines […]

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Amelia, it was just a false alarm

Nah, jet fuel can’t melt steel beams. I’ve watched enough conspiracy documentaries – Camp Cope Some ideas persist long after the mounting evidence against them becomes overwhelming. Some of these things are kooky but probably harmless (try as I might, I do not care about ESP etc), whereas some are deeply damaging (I’m looking at you “vaccines […]

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I think they use witchcraft

The following came in the email today: On Jul 7, 2018, at 12:58 PM, Submissions <submissions@**.co.in> wrote: Hello Dr. Andrew Gelman, I am Dr. ** [American-sounding name], Research Assistant for the ** Publishing Company contacting you with reference from our Editorial Board. Are you tired of publishing your Manuscript in useless journals and get no […]

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Tutorial: The practical application of complicated statistical methods to fill up the scientific literature with confusing and irrelevant analyses

James Coyne pointed me with distress or annoyance to this new paper, “Tutorial: The Practical Application of Longitudinal Structural Equation Mediation Models in Clinical Trials,” by K. A. Goldsmith, D. P. MacKinnon, T. Chalder, P. D. White, M. Sharpe, and A. Pickles. This is the team behind the PACE trial for systemic exercise intolerance disease. […]

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On this 4th of July, let’s declare independence from “95%”

Plan your experiment, gather your data, do your inference for all effects and interactions of interest. When all is said and done, accept some level of uncertainty in your conclusions: you might not be 97.5% sure that the treatment effect is positive, but that’s fine. For one thing, decisions need to be made. You were […]

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The “Psychological Science Accelerator”: it’s probably a good idea but I’m still skeptical

Asher Meir points us to this post by Christie Aschwanden entitled, “Can Teamwork Solve One Of Psychology’s Biggest Problems?”, which begins: Psychologist Christopher Chartier admits to a case of “physics envy.” That field boasts numerous projects on which international research teams come together to tackle big questions. Just think of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider or […]

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