Category: Miscellaneous Science

“For professional baseball players, faster hand-eye coordination linked to batting performance”

Kevin Lewis sends along this press release reporting what may be the least surprising laboratory finding since the classic “Participants reported being hungrier when they walked into the café (mean = 7.38, SD = 2.20) than when they walked out [mean = 1.53, SD = 2.70, F(1, 75) = 107.68, P

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The “Carl Sagan effect”

Javier Benítez writes: I am not in academia, but I have learned a lot about science from what’s available to the public. But I also didn’t know that public outreach is looked down upon by academia. See the Carl Sagan Effect. Susana Martinez-Conde writes: One scientist, who agreed to participate on the condition of anonymity—an […]

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The course of science

Shravan Vasishth sends this along:

Yup. Not always, though. Even though the above behavior is rewarded.
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The “Psychological Science Accelerator”: it’s probably a good idea but I’m still skeptical

Asher Meir points us to this post by Christie Aschwanden entitled, “Can Teamwork Solve One Of Psychology’s Biggest Problems?”, which begins: Psychologist Christopher Chartier admits to a case of “physics envy.” That field boasts numerous projects on which international research teams come together to tackle big questions. Just think of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider or […]

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When does the quest for beauty lead science astray?

Under the heading, “please blog about this,” Shravan Vasishth writes: This book by a theoretical physicist [Sabine Hossenfelder] is awesome. The book trailer is here. Some quotes from her blog: “theorists in the foundations of physics have been spectacularly unsuccessful with their predictions for more than 30 years now.” “Everyone is happily producing papers in […]

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What is the role of qualitative methods in addressing issues of replicability, reproducibility, and rigor?

Kara Weisman writes: I’m a PhD student in psychology, and I attended your talk at the Stanford Graduate School of Business earlier this year. I’m writing to ask you about something I remember you discussing at that talk: The possible role of qualitative methods in addressing issues of replicability, reproducibility, and rigor. In particular, I […]

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Global shifts in the phenological synchrony of species interactions over recent decades

Heather Kharouba et al. write: Phenological responses to climate change (e.g., earlier leaf-out or egg hatch date) are now well documented and clearly linked to rising temperatures in recent decades. Such shifts in the phenologies of interacting species may lead to shifts in their synchrony, with cascading community and ecosystem consequences . . . We […]

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A style of argument can be effective in an intellectual backwater but fail in the big leagues—but maybe it’s a good thing to have these different research communities

Following on a post on Tom Wolfe’s evolution-denial trolling, Thanatos Savehn pointed to this obituary, “Jerry A. Fodor, Philosopher Who Plumbed the Mind’s Depths, Dies at 82,” which had lots of interesting items, including this: “We think that what is needed,” they wrote, “is to cut the tree at its roots: to show that Darwin’s […]

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