Author: xi'an

severe testing : beyond Statistics wars?!

A timely start to my reading Deborah Mayo’s [properly printed] Statistical Inference as Severe Testing (How to get beyond the Statistics Wars) on the Armistice Day, as it seems to call for just this, an armistice! And the opportunity of a long flight to Oaxaca in addition… However, this was only the start and it […]

trip to the past

When visiting my mother for the Xmas break, she showed me this picture of her grand-father, Médéric, in his cavalry uniform, taken before the First World War, in 1905. During the war, as an older man, he did not come close to the front lines, but died from a disease caught from the horses he […]

trip to the past

When visiting my mother for the Xmas break, she showed me this picture of her grand-father, Médéric, in his cavalry uniform, taken before the First World War, in 1905. During the war, as an older man, he did not come close to the front lines, but died from a disease caught from the horses he […]

a good start in Series B!

Just received the great news for the turn of the year that our paper on ABC using Wasserstein distance was accepted in Series B! Inference in generative models using the Wasserstein distance, written by Espen Bernton, Pierre Jacob, Mathieu Gerber, and myself, bypasses the (nasty) selection of summary statistics in ABC by considering the Wasserstein […]

mixture modelling for testing hypotheses

After a fairly long delay (since the first version was posted and submitted in December 2014), we eventually revised and resubmitted our paper with Kaniav Kamary [who has now graduated], Kerrie Mengersen, and Judith Rousseau on the final day of 2018. The main reason for this massive delay is mine’s, as I got fairly depressed […]

Monte Carlo fusion

Hongsheng Dai, Murray Pollock (University of Warwick), and Gareth Roberts (University of Warwick) just arXived a paper we discussed together last year while I was at Warwick. Where fusion means bringing different parts of the target distribution f(x)∝f¹(x)f²(x)… together, once simulation from each part has been done. In the same spirit as in Scott et […]

O’Bayes 2019: speakers, discussants, posters!

The program for the next O’Bayes conference in Warwick, 28 June-02 July, 2019, is now set. Speakers and discussants have been contacted by the scientific committee and accepted our invitation! As usual, there will be poster sessions on the nights of 29 and 30 June and the call is open for poster submissions, until January […]

Treasure Island

Just spent a wonderful hour listening to excepts from Stevenson’s Treasure Island while cooking dinner… Actually promoting a new translation (in French) in a much more colloquial version than the one I read as a child. I never get enough of this story (even though Kidnapped remains my favourite and not only mine’s!). As a […]

a book and two chapters on mixtures

The Handbook of Mixture Analysis is now out! After a few years of planning, contacts, meetings, discussions about notations, interactions with authors, further interactions with late authors, repeating editing towards homogenisation, and a final professional edit last summer, this collection of nineteen chapters involved thirty-five contributors. I am grateful to all participants to this piece […]

bootstrap in Nature

A news item in the latest issue of Nature I received about Brad Efron winning the “Nobel Prize of Statistics” this year. The bootstrap is certainly an invention worth the recognition, not to mention Efron’s contribution to empirical Bayes analysis,, even though I remain overall reserved about the very notion of a Nobel prize in […]

Le Monde puzzle [#1076]

A cheezy Le Monde mathematical puzzle : (which took me much longer to find [in the sense of locating] than to solve, as Warwick U does not get a daily delivery of the newspaper [and this is pre-Brexit!]): Take a round pizza (or a wheel of Gruyère) cut into seven identical slices and turn one […]