Blog Archives

Speaking: How to Use A Microphone

November 9, 2017
By
Speaking: How to Use A Microphone

When you’re speaking in front of an audience, you’re almost always using a microphone. The point of the microphone is to help your audience hear you. But it can’t do that if you don’t know how to use it or if you actively work against it. Listen for your own voice. This is the key […]

Read more »

Vis Potpourri, October 2017

October 25, 2017
By
Vis Potpourri, October 2017

A potpourri isn't usually structured, since it's supposed to be thrown together and mixed. But this one has a section on reports from this year's VIS conference, plus various miscellaneous items like a tool to explore a brain atlas, some history on spreadsheets, and a celebration of Archer, among other things. VIS Reports A traditional […]

Read more »

ISOTYPE Book: Florence, Only An Ocean Between

October 23, 2017
By
ISOTYPE Book: Florence, Only An Ocean Between

The book Only An Ocean Between by Lella Secor Florence contains some of the most iconic ISOTYPE charts. It was published in 1943, as part of a small series called America and Britain. Unlike some other ISOTYPE books, this one (and the other two in the series) advertise the charts right on the cover. This […]

Read more »

Portrait: Danielle Albers Szafir

October 18, 2017
By
Portrait: Danielle Albers Szafir

Danielle Albers Szafir received the Best Paper award for her single-author paper, Modeling Color Difference for Visualization Design at InfoVis this year. She is assistant professor at University of Colorado Boulder and runs the CU VisuaLab there. Danielle works on a number of research projects centered around perception, and in particular color, but also topics like visual comparison. […]

Read more »

IEEE VIS 2017: Machine Learning, Diversity, Parties

October 13, 2017
By
IEEE VIS 2017: Machine Learning, Diversity, Parties

I've ignored the major new topic this year so far: machine learning. Another new thing this year, though way overdue, was that we finally started to talk about diversity. And then there were the parties. Machine Learning Machine learning made a big showing this year, though I managed to miss most of the relevant talks […]

Read more »

IEEE VIS 2017: Perception, Evaluation, Vision Science

October 12, 2017
By
IEEE VIS 2017: Perception, Evaluation, Vision Science

Questions of how visualization is read and understood are a common topic in research, and this year was no exception. This part of my IEEE VIS 2017 report covers papers dealing with perceptual issues, the match between visualization and tasks, statistical reasoning, as well as a panel on vision science. Perception Data Visualization Saliency Model: […]

Read more »

IEEE VIS 2017: Word Clouds, Stories, Interaction

October 11, 2017
By
IEEE VIS 2017: Word Clouds, Stories, Interaction

I usually stick to the InfoVis track at VIS, and that was also the case this time. The papers in this part of my report from VIS 2017 cover text, small visualizations like sparklines and glyphs, tools for showing story structure, and multi-device interaction with data. Word Clouds Tag or word clouds are second only […]

Read more »

IEEE VIS 2017: Keynote and Capstone

October 10, 2017
By
IEEE VIS 2017: Keynote and Capstone

Part 2 of my IEEE VIS 2017 report covers the keynote and capstone talks at the conference. They were not just at opposite ends of the conference, but also about as different as they can be in terms of content and delivery. Keynote: Jacqueline H. Chen, Analytics Inspired Visualization: A Holistic In-situ Scientific Workflow at […]

Read more »

IEEE VIS 2017: Best Papers and Other Awards

October 9, 2017
By
IEEE VIS 2017: Best Papers and Other Awards

The IEEE VIS 2017 conference took place last week in Phoenix, AZ. I’m slower to write about it than in previous years, but to make up for that I’m not going in chronological order this time, but will break this report up in a more logical manner. This first part covers the opening, which included […]

Read more »

Visualization as a Field Is Still Invisible

September 26, 2017
By
Visualization as a Field Is Still Invisible

A new series by the New York Times is equally exciting and painful: it presents visualizations for discussion in class, but the outside help they are getting is coming from statistics rather than visualization. It’s another reminder of just how far we still have to go to even be noticed as a research field. The […]

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe