Blog Archives

LMU psychology department distributes funding based on criteria of research transparency

September 29, 2016
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The Psychology Department at LMU Munich continues to change the incentive structure towards reproducible and open science. The internal distribution of funding now partly is based on transparency criteria: Publications with open data, open material and...

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Optional stopping does not bias parameter estimates (if done correctly)

September 29, 2016
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tl;dr: Optional stopping does not bias parameter estimates from a frequentist point of view if all studies are reported (i.e., no publication bias exists) and effect sizes are appropriately meta-analytically weighted. Several recent discussions on the ...

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Introducing the p-hacker app: Train your expert p-hacking skills

September 29, 2016
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[This is a guest post by Ned Bicare, PhD]   Start the p-hacker app! My dear fellow scientists! “If you torture the data long enough, it will confess.” This aphorism, attributed to Ronald Coase, sometimes has been used in a disrespective manner, ...

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Open Science and research quality at the German conference on psychology (DGPs congress in Leipzig)

September 29, 2016
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From 17th to 22th September, the 50th anniversary congress of the German psychological association takes place in Leipzig. On previous conferences in Germany in the last two or three years, the topic of the credibility crisis and research transparency ...

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About replication bullies and scientific progress …

September 7, 2015
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These days psychology really is exciting, and I do not mean the Frster case … In May 2014 a special issue full of replication attempts has been released – all open access, all raw data released! This is great work, powered by the open scien...

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In the era of #repligate: What are valid cues for the trustworthiness of a study?

September 7, 2015
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[Update 2015/1/14: I consolidate feedback from Twitter, comments, email, and real life into the main text (StackExchange-style), so that we get a good and improving answer. Thanks to @TonyLFreitas,@PhDefunct, @bahniks, @JoeHilgard, @_r_c_a, @richardmor...

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Gaze-cueing and trustworthiness: New paper + raw data + R script on OSF

September 7, 2015
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Recently, a student of mine (Felix Senbach, now at the University of Edinburgh) and I published a little study on gaze-cueing, and how it is moderated by the trustworthiness of the gazing person. In a nutshell, although instructed to ignore the gaze, p...

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#HIBAR: Why Using Age as a Proxy for Testosterone is a Bad Deal.

September 7, 2015
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This is a post-publication peer review (HIBAR: “Had I Been A Reviewer”) of the following paper: Levi, M., Li, K., & Zhang, F. (2010). Deal or no deal: Hormones and the mergers and acquisitions game. Management Science 56, 1462 -1483. A ...

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Introducing: The Open Science Committee at our department

July 28, 2015
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Large-scale replication projects of the last years (e.g., ManyLabs I, II, and III, Reproducibility Project: Psychology) showed that the “replication crisis” in psychology is more than just hot air: According to recent estimates, ~60% of cur...

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Grades of evidence – A cheat sheet

April 17, 2015
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There are at least three traditions in statistics which work with a kind of likelihood ratios (LRs): the “Bayes factor camp”, the “AIC camp”, and the “likehood camp”. In my experience, unfortunately most people do no...

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