Trial by combat, law school style

September 13, 2017
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(This article was originally published at Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science, and syndicated at StatsBlogs.)

This story is hilarious. 78-year-old law professor was told he can no longer teach a certain required course; this jeopardizes his current arrangement where he is paid full time but only teaches one semester a year, so he’s suing his employer . . . Columbia Law School.

The beautiful part of this story is how logical it all is. Dude wins the case? That means he’s such a stone-cold lawyer that he can sue Columbia University and win, thus he clearly is qualified to teach a required course. But if he loses the case, he’s a fool’s fool who foolishly thought he ever had a chance to win this lawsuit, and thus is clearly unqualified to teach at a top law school.

It’s trial by combat, but this time it makes sense.

The only part that doesn’t work is that he seems to have hired a law firm. Really he should be representing himself. That would make the story better.

P.S. I don’t know any of the people involved in this one, and the reactions here are just mine; I’m not speaking in any official Columbia University capacity.

The post Trial by combat, law school style appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.



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