“This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but it indicates a 94.6% prob­ability that statins were responsible for the symptoms.”

August 6, 2017
By

(This article was originally published at Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science, and syndicated at StatsBlogs.)

Charles Jackson writes:

The attached item from JAMA, which I came across in my doctor’s waiting room, contains the statements:

Nineteen of 203 patients treated with statins and 10 of 217 patients treated with placebo met the study definition of myalgia (9.4% vs 4.6%. P = .054). This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but it indicates a 94.6% prob­ability that statins were responsible for the symptoms.

Disregarding the statistical issues involving NHST and posterior probability, ​I assume that the author means to say ” . . . that statins were responsible for the symptoms in about half of the treated patients.” I doubt if statins caused the myalgia in the untreated patients.

Yup. Statistics is hard, like basketball, or knitting. Even Jama editors can get these things horribly wrong.

The post “This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but it indicates a 94.6% prob­ability that statins were responsible for the symptoms.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.



Please comment on the article here: Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science

Tags: , ,


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe